Devin Davis Archive

Devin Davis signs with Odessa College

Former Indiana forward Devin Davis is headed the junior college route.

As first reported by Joshua Parrott of Basketball Times, Davis will continue his career at Odessa College in Texas. Devin Davis Sr. confirmed the report to Inside the Hall.

Davis, along with Hanner Mosquera-Perea, were dismissed from the program last month for “not living up to their responsibilities to the program.” He was cited on May 11 for possession of marijuana when officers arrived at a dormitory room on IU’s campus after receiving a complaint about the smell of burnt marijuana.

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Right call made in dismissals of Davis, Mosquera-Perea

The message sent from IU announcing the dismissals of Devin Davis and Hanner Mosquera-Perea on Thursday was succinct. It needed no further explanation.

Enough is enough.

In less than 35 words, the program announced Davis and Mosquera-Perea failed to live up to their responsibilities. Effective immediately, they were no longer part of the team.

Both players were given second chances by Tom Crean to remain with the program after making mistakes that exhibited a lack of judgement. In Mosquera-Perea’s case, it was operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol on Feb. 14, 2014, which could have resulted – but fortunately did not – in a serious injury. And in the case of Davis, it was a disregard for Crean’s advice for 20 minutes earlier that night of what to steer clear of on Halloween night. In the early morning hours of Nov. 1, 2014, Davis was involved in a serious accident that also involved alcohol.

With their poor decisions this week, when Davis was cited for possession of marijuana in an on-campus housing building with Mosquera-Perea also present, both players showed that getting a second chance meant more to Crean than it did to them. And in the process, Davis and Mosquera-Perea lost their futures in Bloomington.

The decision to dismiss them had to be made. They had run out of chances to remain a part of the program.

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Devin Davis and Hanner Mosquera-Perea dismissed from Indiana

Devin Davis and Hanner Mosquera-Perea have been dismissed from the Indiana men’s basketball program for “not living up to their responsibilities to the program,” IU announced late Thursday afternoon.

“Indiana men’s basketball announces that sophomore Devin Davis and senior Hanner Mosquera-Perea have been dismissed from the program effective immediately for not living up to their responsibilities to the program,” a release stated.

Davis was cited on Monday evening for possession of marijuana when officers arrived at a dormitory room on IU’s campus after receiving a complaint about the smell of burnt marijuana. Mosquera-Perea, who was not cited, was with Davis in that room.

Indiana announced an indefinite suspension for Davis on Tuesday and also said that it was reviewing Mosquera-Perea’s involvement in the incident.

Davis, a Warren Central product, missed the entire 2014-2015 season following his involvement in a car accident in the early hours of Nov. 1, 2014, after which he has battled a traumatic brain injury.

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Devin Davis cited for possession of marijuana, suspended indefinitely

Indiana forward Devin Davis, who missed all of last season following a traumatic brain injury, was cited for possession of marijuana on Monday night by the IU police department.

The news was first reported by Mike Miller of The Herald-Times.

Davis was cited just after 8 p.m. after the IU police department was called to Hickory Hall, which is on Union Street. According to IUPD, officers could smell marijuana coming from an open second floor window and found marijuana in Davis’ backpack. He was cited for marijuana possession under 30 grams and will have a court date.

IU announced early Tuesday afternoon that Davis has been suspended indefinitely from all team activities.

“We have been made aware that Indiana sophomore Devin Davis was cited by IUPD for possession of marijuana in an IU dormitory room last evening,” IU media relations said in a statement. “Effective immediately, Davis has been suspended from all team activities. Any additional action related to Davis’ status will occur after further review of this matter. We understand that junior Hanner Mosquera-Perea was present at the time of the incident but was not charged by IUPD. Mosquera-Perea’s role, if any, will also be reviewed as part of this matter.”

Davis, a product of Warren Central, was hospitalized for 19 days following an accident last November that also involved Emmitt Holt, but was able to return to school for the second semester and even dressed for IU’s final regular season game against Michigan State.

He also traveled with the team for several games during the second semester.

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Indiana planning for return of Devin Davis

Indiana’s frontcourt will get a major boost with the addition of McDonald’s All-American Thomas Bryant next fall. But the Hoosiers also hope a familiar face will return as a significant contributor.

Devin Davis, who missed the 2014-2015 season following an accident in the early hours of Nov. 1, continues to make progress in his rehab, Tom Crean said Wednesday.

“He’s doing everything everybody else is doing except he does not play and he doesn’t get any contact,” Crean said. “But we won’t know probably – we’ll know a lot better in the summer, but we may not totally know until we get into the school year, but am I projecting him to be here? Well, certainly in my own mind I am, but does that mean he is completely? Not yet. Medically speaking not yet.”

During IU’s foreign tour last August, Davis looked like a player who was ready to take a major step forward in his sophomore season.

He’d put on 10 pounds of muscle and seemed much more comfortable playing away from the basket with the ball while still maintaining his aggressiveness around the basket. His 7.6 rebounds per game over five contests in Canada led the Hoosiers. In a 95-85 win over perennial Canadian power Carleton, Davis had 13 points and six rebounds. He also had a 16-rebound performance on the trip.

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That’s A Wrap: The Other Guys

Welcome to “That’s A Wrap,” our player-by-player recap of the 2014-2015 Indiana Hoosiers. Today: Indiana’s minor contributors, including Devin Davis, Tim Priller, Jeremiah April, Nate Ritchie, Jordan Fuchs and Ryan Burton.

Devin Davis: The 2014-2015 season for Davis started as one of potential and hope, as he proved to be a significant contributor and the Hoosiers’ leading rebounder during the team’s preseason tour of Canada. But days before the Hoosiers’ first exhibition game of the season, Davis was involved in a car accident that left him in serious condition with a traumatic brain injury. Not surprisingly, his long-term and short-term health took precedence over making a return to action this season. He is back in classes this semester and is participating in practices with his teammates, but he remains limited in contact drills — still with no guarantees on his long-term basketball playing future.

Tim Priller: It was clear that early on in his Indiana career, Priller was going to be a fan favorite. Maybe it was his hair, maybe it was his (slow) speed, but whenever the 6-foot-9 Texas native touched the ball this season, the Hoosiers faithful begged for Priller to shoot. That said, Priller did not play often and showed little of what he can contribute to Indiana, as his lack of athleticism and lack of offensive prowess kept him sidelined for much of the season.

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Crean on Devin Davis: “It’s going to take time”

Indiana sophomore Devin Davis, who missed the entire 2014-2015 season after an accident on Nov. 1 that resulted in a traumatic brain injury, is continuing to make progress in his rehab, but there’s no firm timetable on his return according to Tom Crean.

On the ESPNU college basketball podcast earlier today with Andy Katz and Seth Greenburg, Crean said that he expects Davis to play again, but added that he still has a long way to go.

“I think the chances are good (that he can return). It’s still a long road,” Crean said. “He’s back doing workouts. We’ve started our individual workouts yesterday. In fact it’s almost 70 degrees here so I walked outside to take this call and he was down in the gym just now when I walked out of there. He just turned 21 the other day, so that was great to see him celebrate a birthday after everything that we went through in November.

“But it’s going to take time. We’re nowhere near the contact. We’re nowhere near where we can get up and down the court. We’re pushing him hard, we’re trying to get him better with his shot, keep building his conditioning, his strength, but we’re still a long ways off before he’s going to be able to play but we’ve been given no indication to believe that we wouldn’t be able to do that. But to put a timeline on it, still, even all of these months later, it’s still impossible to do.”

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Indiana’s late run falls short in 74-72 loss to Michigan State

As the buzzer sounded for the under-4 media timeout in the second half of Saturday’s game against Michigan State, Hoosiers fans became restless. Indiana trailed by 11 points and Yogi Ferrell had just turned the ball over with just 3:50 remaining.

Fans began to boo. Some left Assembly Hall. But the Hoosiers didn’t quit.

Indiana went on a 16-7 run in the final 3:15, but it wasn’t enough. The Hoosiers (19-12, 9-9) on Saturday lost their third straight game in a 74-72 defeat to the Spartans (21-10, 12-6).

“I feel like we came out too slow and we all tried to turn it on too late,” freshman James Blackmon Jr. said. “We turned it on and made that run, but we should have just picked it up from the start.”

After a first half in which both teams were even on the scoreboard, Indiana went on a 4-0 spurt to start the second half — two quick layups back-to-back to bring Indiana’s lead to a 38-34 margin. Michigan State, though, would follow with a 9-0 run of its own, setting the tone for much of the second half.

Two offensive rebounds led to a Marvin Clark 3-pointer. A missed Hanner Mosquera-Perea layup turned into an Alvin Ellis III layup in just four seconds. Another offensive rebound led to a Clark put-back. And then the Spartans tore the Hoosiers’ zone apart off a set-play, ending in a Travis Trice jumper.

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Crean: “There’s certainly no way” Devin Davis plays this season

Indiana sophomore Devin Davis, who returned to school this semester after a traumatic brain injury in early November, will not play this season.

On the ESPNU college basketball podcast this morning with Andy Katz and Seth Greenburg, IU coach Tom Crean said that Davis has returned to classes, but not on a full-time basis, and that the hope is that he’ll be fully recovered for next season.

“He’s got a lot of different things that he’s having to deal with and continuing to build his therapy,” Crean told Katz. “He’s making progress, the doctors say he’s making progress and his attitude is great. There’s certainly no way he’s going to play this year, obviously, but hopefully he’s going to have a full recovery and an even better understanding and maturity to be able to go next year.”

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Devin Davis acclimating to life back in Bloomington

Sophomore Devin Davis is adjusting to life back in Bloomington.

After being absent from the Indiana men’s basketball team for more than two months while rehabilitating from a car accident on Nov. 1 that left him with a traumatic brain injury, Davis returned to campus on Jan. 6. He has been back for less than two weeks. And he slowly is returning to normal activities.

Saturday evening, Davis will be leaving Bloomington again — but this time it will be with his teammates. After doctors’ approval, Davis will be traveling with the Hoosiers to their Sunday afternoon game at Illinois. It will be his first trip with the team this season.

“His attitude is great,” Indiana coach Tom Crean said. “He feels he’s doing really well. He feels he’s recovered at a really high rate. But we have to keep trusting the plan and trusting the doctors constantly on what that means. And I like the fact that he’s hungry but you also have to remain patient knowing that we’re all dealing with something that most of us — especially him — … have never dealt with this before.”

While Davis was gone, every day during practices the Hoosiers would leave his jersey and shorts on a chair as a reminder of their missing teammate.

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