That’s A Wrap: Team offense

  • 04/09/2018 9:50 am in

Welcome to “That’s A Wrap,” our recap of the 2017-2018 Indiana Hoosiers. Up next: Team offense.

Final stats (31 games): 71.9 ppg, 45.6 FG%, 51.1 eFG%, 32.2 3PFG%, 18.2 TO%, 31.8 OR%, 36.4% FTR.

As is typically the case following a coaching change, Indiana’s offense underwent significant changes in the 2017-18 season.

Under Tom Crean, the Hoosiers frequently put an efficient offensive team on the floor with one major caveat. Crean’s Indiana teams often posted some of the best shooting numbers in the country, but struggled with turnovers. And in the instances when Indiana wasn’t hitting from the perimeter under Crean, the Hoosiers didn’t have much to fall back on. It was, at times, a feast or famine style of offense.

Archie Miller’s first Indiana team wasn’t elite offensively, but the Hoosiers still finished in the top 100 in Ken Pomeroy’s adjusted offensive efficiency metric.

The one major improvement Indiana exhibited in year one of the Miller era was improvement in taking care of the ball. After finishing 322nd nationally in turnover percentage in the 2016-2017 season, Indiana moved up to 164th nationally in 2017-2018. The team turnover percentage dropped from 21.4 percent to 18.2 percent.

The Hoosiers played a more controlled, deliberate pace under Miller, which was an adjustment for many of the players on the roster. For the season, Indiana played the 251st fastest pace in the country.

Two other strengths of Indiana’s offense this past season were getting to the free throw line and offensive rebounding. Indiana ranked 89th nationally in free throw rate (FTA/FGA) and in conference games, the Hoosiers were fifth in free throw rate. However, Indiana failed to capitalize on those numbers because of poor free throw shooting. The Hoosiers ranked just 331st nationally in free throw percentage at 65.7.

Indiana finished the season ranked 74th in the country in offensive rebounding percentage. In conference play, the Hoosiers had the Big Ten’s seventh best offensive rebounding percentage. The best example of IU’s strength on the offensive glass came in a narrow 63-60 loss to Michigan State on Feb. 3 when the Hoosiers grabbed 49 percent of their missed shots.

A major area of regression for Indiana’s offense was its perimeter shooting. After ranking in the top 50 nationally in each of the previous three seasons in 3-point shooting, the Hoosiers fell all the way down to 307th nationally in Miller’s first season. No player on the roster finished with a 3-point shooting percentage over 40 and the team’s 3-point percentage was 32.2.

Bottom Line: One frequent complaint from Indiana fans in the Crean era was Indiana’s inability to take care of the ball and Miller went right to work in correcting that problem in his first season on the job. The Hoosiers still weren’t great at taking care of the ball, but did make significant strides. The shooting woes, however, really limited Indiana’s ability to play with elite teams. There were several contests in which Indiana played elite competition close – Duke, Purdue and Michigan State, to name a few – but the Hoosiers simply didn’t have the offensive firepower late in games to keep pace. That problem should be rectified in future seasons as Indiana’s talent level is upgraded via recruiting.

Quotable: “I thought we played extremely hard and we brought the fight to the game that we needed. Offensively they had a lot to do with the numbers, just in terms of impacting the rim and the field goal percentage offense with their shot blocking and their size, made it hard on us. And clearly we weren’t able to dial it up from 3 again. But credit our guys. I thought they really fought hard and played hard. We’re getting, especially against some really good teams right now, you know, the last two to three minutes just having to find a way to make a couple of plays. And I think that’s what teams who know how to win do, teams like Michigan State and Purdue. With two minutes on the line they know they’re going to win.” – Miller after Indiana’s loss against Michigan State and IU’s inability to make offensive plays late in close games.

PreviouslyJustin SmithAl Durham Jr.Clifton MooreDevonte GreenDe’Ron DavisZach McRobertsJuwan MorganFreddie McSwainTim PrillerJosh NewkirkCollin Hartman, Robert Johnson

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  • coachv

    say what???

  • coachv

    holy cripes! i need to get out from under this rock

  • calbert40

    And I didn’t even mention that Archie was accomplishing this with Crean’s players. Obviously, those players were talented, but they weren’t hand picked by Archie to run his system. Archie seems to be the type of coach who is pretty particular about roster construction.

    If our fan base will just give him time, I think he’s going to do fantastic here.

  • calbert40

    T = The
    F = a word I won’t type…

    🙂

  • calbert40

    I think you’re missing the point. You are the one making a big deal about it. No one says you have to follow all of the players on Twitter.

  • coachv

    i’m confused. schilling was miller’s best man? and schilling coached at memphis? who was introduced to miller?

  • coachv

    i would enjoy being 8 years old again

  • coachv

    or on my anniversary the next day. hopefully delivered along with divorce papers

  • calbert40

    To recap:

    1) Nick doesn’t want players (or coaches…IIRC Nick didn’t like Crean talking about his faith either) publicly talking about their faith, even though acknowledging that many of them feel as though it is their “duty” to profess their faith publicly.
    2) He frequently tell us he doesn’t want to talk about religion.
    3) Some of the rest of us say that Nick is the one who keeps bringing it up, and if he doesn’t want to talk about it…maybe he should stop bringing it up.
    4) Nick claims that it is “harassment” when we tell people to stop talking about religion.

    Please tell me the double standard isn’t apparent to only me.

  • coachv

    sorry, only on my first cup of coffee

  • coachv

    nevermind. not you

  • coachv

    the thing about highlights is all the shots go in and all the passes lead to baskets. i have not seen him play. i don’t know what a commanding nba presence is but i stopped watching the nba around the time sprewell choked pj and webber admitted during an interview he was tanking games so he could get traded

  • calbert40

    The 1st amendment is tricky. We have rights, but those rights aren’t free of consequence. I can tell my boss to go blank himself, because I have the right to express my opinions. He can fire me, though. Me getting fired wouldn’t mean that my right to speech was removed. My speech just had a negative consequence associated with it.

    Any player, Christian or otherwise, is free to express his opinion on religion, politics, etc while a member of the IU basketball team. That doesn’t mean he is free from people trolling his Twitter feed or saying mean things to him at a game.

    I will agree with Nick on the point that the reason most people are okay with what most players say is that they agree with that player’s opinions. If the player mentioned was Islamic, I think many of the people who like him because he’s an outspoken Christian would immediately change their mind and want him to keep his beliefs to himself. While I believe that’s true, that doesn’t mean that we should NOT want a player, because his views might go against what some of the fan base likes. I’m all for recruiting the best team we can regardless of their religious or political beliefs.

  • calbert40

    Sorry if I misrepresented your position, Nick. I feel I understand it better now…even if I still don’t agree with you.

    I don’t view a player’s personal social media page as an extension of the university. None of us would view a student on a full academic scholarship as representing IU on their Twitter feed, so why should we have different rules for an athlete? I don’t think that there is a “duty” for any coach or player to say or not say anything. (And yes…I’d feel the same way if he was Islamic or an atheist). I can choose to ignore them.

    Maybe this is OT, but as the dad of two young girls (12 and 9), I find that one of the hardest things to teach is fairness. Note…not tolerance or equality…fairness. When my oldest daughter asks me about politics, I typically don’t give her my beliefs on the matter, at least not initially. I try to tell her what each side believes on the matter and why. I want her to make up her own mind, but also to view the “other side” fairly. I think all of us struggle with being fair towards people with whom we disagree. Evidently, I’m not above it either. 🙂

  • I’m not saying we don’t need guards, I’m saying that I don’t get the assumption that the coaching staff isn’t pursuing guard options for next season beyond Romeo. Of course, we need guards, and yes, we need better shooting. I say our shooting should be improved next season because we’re bringing in some players who (hopefully) can shoot in Anderson, Phinisee, and Hunter.

  • calbert40

    I think the sticking point here is how we are identified socially. Using Marshall as the example, he is affiliated with the program, and uses his social media presence in a professional context. However, I think we all understand that we are more than our occupation, correct? Would we have a problem with Marshall posting something like “Had a great time with the family at the Children’s Museum today. The new exhibit is amazing!”

    Nope. No issue, right? How about “I’m really excited that House Bill 1111 just passed! #Pumped!” What about now? Obviously, I didn’t say what HB 1111 was about to keep from muddying the waters, but as soon as we talk politics or religion, we change our views on the person saying it. I happen to think that says more about me than the person who said the “offensive” thing, though.

    We don’t care when people use their affiliated accounts to talk about sunshine, rainbows and unicorns, but when they start talking about politics or faith, we bristle. The question is should we?

  • calbert40

    Does a player expressing his/her opinion on a topic, regardless of how potentially contentious that topic may be, exclude anyone from sharing his/her contrary opinion?

    I don’t believe a player sharing his Christian beliefs (or Islamic or Republican or Democratic or atheist…) means that the entire institution doesn’t value inclusiveness. In fact, I would argue that allowing students to express their beliefs in this way shows that the institution values inclusiveness even more than having them be quiet about it would.

  • calbert40

    haha…I should read further below before posting!

  • IU Hoosiers # 34, 1979-83

    T. Foster?

  • coachv

    oh him. how could i forget?

  • IU Hoosiers # 34, 1979-83

    Lol!!!! I’ll let you know if we are coming to the FIU game. Behave young man!

  • coachv

    i’m old and i like to drink so…

  • coachv

    ok. i was trying to figure out which player or coach you were referring to. what did you not get?

  • coachv

    this year, if we go, i’m buying the cheapest seats possible as you can walk freely around the upper pavilion and sit anywhere you want. it was the absolute worst football environment i’ve ever been to. felt more like a rave. screaming disc jockey in place of an announcer, and blaring hip hop for 4 hours. just awful.

  • coachv

    i agree with you when it comes to coaches as they are paid by state tax dollars, so separation an all that. kids don’t get paid nor do they have undue influence over other players so they can say what they want. my two cents. which leaves me broke

  • coachv

    yes?

  • coachv

    whenever i think of selfish play i think of bracey wright

  • IU Hoosiers # 34, 1979-83

    You’re younger than me! I’m dieting this week just for my yearly physical. Kinda sad.

  • coachv

    but i have a 4 and 6 year old i’m home with so i’m aging faster. i started drinking now to make sure i’m drunk enough for my colonoscopy next month

  • coachv

    you might be a year younger if those numbers represent your tenure at iu

  • AndyCapp

    I don’t think, or at least believe, the fan base is getting impatient Cal. If they are that is more than just a little unrealistic. However, we know we need help in shooting and when home grown players like RT go somewhere else, especially another B1G school, its disconcerting. I don’t for a minute think we will get all home grown players but RT prolly would have helped where we need immediate improvement.

  • AndyCapp

    LMAO, too funny! Will havta try that before MY next colonoscopy 😉

  • AndyCapp

    I think it’s a fallacy to suggest that 99% of the fans might be concentrating on Romeo… guess I’m in the 1% but happy to be there. I’m more concentrating on where we have the greatest need and shooters like RT that can fill that need. Can Romeo? Sure. But he is a longer shot than players like RT who was a proven long range shooter. Did Archie and his staff do all they could to pursue him? We will never know. But if they did and he STILL chose NW then that should be worrisome. Am I panicking? Nope

  • coachv

    we have the home kit for parties with our friends but i don’t think this one will be the same

  • coachv

    i’m all for INCLUSION but they are kids, they have been brainwashed and indoctrinated since they were toddlers and haven’t been away from home long enough to start thinking for themselves. hopefully attending university and getting a whiff of science, along with differing perspectives will help them to see the light. you know, that there is no light

  • calbert40

    Taylor certainly would have helped, but I think people are overreacting to him choosing NW over IU. He’s good, not great.

    And that’s kinda where I’m coming from with regards to the comment about the negative fan base. Obviously, fan is short for fanatic, and fanatics aren’t known for being reasonable. I get that. Still, we need to be patient and give Archie a chance to implement his system.