Jordan Hulls Archive

That’s A Wrap: Jordan Hulls

IUJackITH0003Welcome to “That’s A Wrap,” our player-by-player recap of the 2012-2013 Indiana Hoosiers. Today: Jordan Hulls.

Hulls (36 games): 9.7 points, 2.9 assists, 2.4 rebounds, 0.8 steals, 44.6% FG, 44.7% 3PFG, 77.6% FT in 28.8 minutes per game.

Jordan Hulls began his Indiana career in the fall of 2009 hopeful that he and classmates like Christian Watford, Derek Elston and Maurice Creek could bring a storied program back from the bottom of college basketball.

Four years, 78 wins, two Sweet Sixteen appearances and an outright Big Ten championship later, it’s safe to say Indiana is back to national relevancy.

His career also started with doubters who believed that he, despite a state championship and a Mr. Basketball award at Bloomington South, didn’t have the size or physical makeup to lead a winning program in the Big Ten.

The final tally of Hulls’ numbers while at Indiana say those doubts were unfounded. The Bloomington native leaves as the school’s career leader in games played (135) and with 1,318 career points.

But beyond those numbers and his efficient shooting, Hulls also had a major impact as a guy who was willing to get in the gym and get better on a daily basis, a trait that eventually rubbed off on his Hoosier teammates.

Prior to IU’s home game with Iowa this past season, his father, J.C., told a story about a family vacation where the plan was to take a break from basketball for a week. According to J.C., the break was short lived before Jordan found a court outdoors and got back to work on his game. That work ethic became contagious inside the IU program as guys like Victor Oladipo and Will Sheehey joined Hulls in Assembly Hall and Cook Hall and saw their respective games take major leaps forward as a result.

The leadership of Hulls inside the program also became more apparent as his career moved along. The first sign that he had emerged as a leader came in August of 2011, when Elston told reporters that Hulls had kicked a couple of guys out of conditioning. “He is a lot more vocal,” Elston said. “He’s one of those guys that starts screaming now. Conditioning days, if you’re not making it, Jordy’s the first one to tell you. And whether you like the way he’s saying it or not, he’s going to say it. If that doesn’t motivate you, then he’ll get you off the floor.”

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Source: Hulls played through shoulder separation in final IU games

033013In the days leading up to Indiana’s Sweet 16 game with Syracuse at the Verizon Center, much attention was paid to the health of the right shoulder of Jordan Hulls.

And that was with good reason.

After the IU senior was involved in a collision during the first half of IU’s win over Temple, he returned in the second half wearing extra support under his jersey and scored five key points to help the Hoosiers move on to Washington D.C.

In the locker room after that win, Maurice Creek told reporters that Hulls told teammates that he’d “have to cut his legs off to keep him from playing” in the second half.

With three days of rest leading into the Syracuse game and comments on Wednesday from Hulls that he’d be fine to play in the regional semifinal, it appeared that his shoulder injury would not be an issue. Hulls knocked down 3-pointers from all over the court in IU’s open practice on Wednesday and wasn’t wearing any extra support underneath his jersey.

But when the ball tipped against the Orange, Hulls was again wearing the support under his jersey and a source tells Inside the Hall that the IU senior suffered a level 1 AC shoulder separation in the win over Temple.

The shoulder blade and collarbone are connected by the acromioclavicular or AC joint, which is held together by the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments. In a level 1 separation, the AC ligament is partially torn, but the coracoclavicular ligament is not.

Hulls played 27 minutes against Syracuse, finishing scoreless (0-for-6 from the field) with three rebounds, two assists and a steal.

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Indiana’s dream season ended far too early

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WASHINGTON — Jordan Hulls sat at his locker room in the Verizon Center, tears welling to his eyes when asked questions about the season and about his special senior class.

For four years, Hulls had dreamed of the opportunity he and his teammates had in front of them. They were a No. 1 seed, a favorite to reach the Final Four in Atlanta. All this after beginning from the very bottom with the NCAA Tournament a mere pipe dream.

This wasn’t supposed to end so soon. This was Indiana’s Dream Team, one constructed with so much talent and chemistry, it may never be replicated by Tom Crean and his staff. You can recruit all the top 50 players you want, but you can’t make them like each other and play together the way these guys did. There will never be an Indiana team quite like this again.

Crean and his staff know that, which is what made this one hurt more than most. The Indiana coaching staff remained in the Verizon Center locker room until after 2 a.m., and the team bus didn’t pull out of the arena until 2:21 a.m.

“There are no words to describe how I feel,” junior guard Victor Oladipo said after Indiana’s 61-50 loss to Syracuse in the Sweet 16. “I love playing with these guys. I’ll never forget this team for as long as I live.”

He should remember the good moments from this season. This team has earned that. Wins at Michigan, Michigan State and Ohio State. A Big Ten outright championship. Two All-Americans. A No. 1 seed. A second straight trip to the Sweet 16.

But, fair or not, the loss to Syracuse will probably always stick to the memories of the Indiana players the most. It was an opportunity missed, it turned an otherwise terrific season into a giant disappointment. The Hoosiers went to the Sweet 16 last year. This year, they needed to go further. They should have gone further.

“It’s over,” Hulls said, his voice cracking. “It’s just tough. We prepared so hard, we just didn’t go out there and execute like we needed to. It’s a terrible way to go out.”

All week long, we talked and heard about the challenge of the Syracuse 2-3 zone. The Hoosiers seemed confident on Wednesday, acting like they were prepared for the unique defense they would see.

But they were not. Twelve turnovers in the first half told you that. As hard as they may have prepared for Jim Boeheim’s team, they didn’t know and never did figure out how to attack and score against the zone.

“They’re length is not really something you can practice against,” Hulls said. “We turned the ball over, didn’t hit shots. We were overthinking, didn’t quite know what we wanted to do at certain times.”

The Hoosiers made a run in the second half — they got it to within six points at one point — but they couldn’t sustain it for a fairly simple reason: They didn’t make shots. To beat the Syracuse zone, you have to make some perimeter shots to loosen it up. Indiana was 3-of-15 from beyond the arc.

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Indiana prepares for new challenge in Syracuse zone

IUTempleITH0008WASHINGTON — Indiana saw just about everything imaginable in the Big Ten this season.

But not quite.

“We don’t see a lot of 2-3 zone like this,” guard Jordan Hulls said of Syracuse. “They’re very long, very athletic, they close out to balls a lot faster than what we’ve seen, even on film.”

The Hoosiers will finally get a look at the Syracuse zone that gets talked about so much when they play the Orange in a Sweet 16 game Thursday night at the Verizon Center.

What makes the Syracuse different and more challenging than other zones is the athletes Jim Boeheim recruits to play in it. Brandon Triche (6-foot-4) is the shortest player in the Orange’s starting lineup, and the other four are Michael Carter-Williams (6-foot-6), James Southerland (6-foot-8), C.J. Fair (6-foot-8) and Rakeem Christmas (6-foot-9).

“They’re athletic guys, long guys. They like to get up in your face,” said forward Will Sheehey. “They get out and challenge passing lanes, they don’t kinda pack it in. It’s almost like a pressure 2-3 zone.”

Added point guard Yogi Ferrell: “They have the best zone defense in the country. We’ve been practicing against it, watching a lot of film. It’s going to be a very tough test for us.”

Crean coached against Boeheim and Syracuse twice when he was at Marquette, so the zone won’t be completely new to him when he sees it Thursday night. Plus, Crean had almost four days to prepare for it, so the turnaround wasn’t all that short.

Even so, the Syracuse zone has proven to be one that can add new wrinkles and function in different ways depending on the opponent and the game. Plus, Crean is 0-2 in those two games.

“At Marquette we didn’t necessarily have the ability to score in the low post that maybe we have now,” Crean said Wednesday. “So it was a little bit different attack and we had good guards, people like Jerel McNeal, Wes Matthews, you know Dominic James, Lazar Hayward, so people like that that could make plays but we didn’t necessarily have the low post ability.

“I don’t think you can look at that zone and think you’re going to beat it any one way but I don’t think you can look at the zone and think you can stand around and pass the ball around the perimeter, either. That is a recipe for defeat.”

One thing that will be key to beating the zone is knocking down perimeter shots, especially early in the game. The Hoosiers didn’t shoot particularly well against Temple on Sunday, and that will have to change.

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HD Video: Indiana players preview Syracuse

WASHINGTON — Watch and listen to what the IU players had to say inside their locker room of the Verizon Center as they prepared for Thursday’s NCAA Tournament game with Syracuse.

High-definition quality video is available in the embedded media players below:

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Video: Crean, players preview Syracuse

Tom Crean, Victor Oladipo, Christian Watford, Cody Zeller and Jordan Hulls addressed the media Wednesday afternoon at the Verizon Center before Thursday night’s Sweet Sixteen matchup with the Syracuse Orange.

Tom Crean:

Oladipo, Watford, Zeller and Hulls:

You can read a full transcript here.

A second look at Indiana-Temple

IUTempleITH0012Sunday afternoon’s game had so much to it, it was difficult to digest it all immediately after the game. Especially when a late March snowstorm was staring right at the greater Dayton area.

So, after more than 24 hours to think about and analyze the Hoosiers’ 58-52 win over Temple, and how they got there, I took a look at the game in a much more complete way.

First, when I said in my column from Sunday night that the Hoosier won ugly, I wasn’t kidding. It was UGLY in every possible way, and Indiana undoubtedly caught some breaks (like the fact that every Temple player not named Wyatt seemed to forget how to score), but to advance in the NCAA Tournament, you sometimes need an element of luck. Ask Marquette. Or Ohio State. Or Miami.

The fact of the matter is, in a game they had no business winning, the Hoosiers found a way to advance to the Sweet 16 for the second straight year. And ultimately, that’s all that matters. I remember sitting on my couch watching the 2008 team play in the Tournament. There was no fight, no will, no desire. The Hoosiers faced adversity, and they quit.

When Tom Crean took control of the program, he vowed to change the culture. So give him credit because he has done that. Even when the Hoosiers trailed and couldn’t seem to do anything right against Temple, they kept believing. They played hurt. They made winning plays.

That, more than anything, is what I take from Indiana’s third-round win. Sure, it was ugly and there are many things that need to be corrected before it sees Syracuse on Thursday night, but we now know that this team has no quit in it (if we didn’t already).

Who’d Wyatt score on?

Not everything about the Hoosiers’ win over Temple, of course, was pretty. There was this guy, Khalif Wyatt, who went off in the first half and poured in 31 points. Wyatt’s done it many times before, but his production against Indiana was a bit surprising because the Hoosiers knew how dangerous he was. And they had the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year in Victor Oladipo to check him.

But nevertheless, Wyatt went off in a losing effort. So how much does it mean? How troubled is Indiana’s defense going forward?

Answer: Not very.

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