Five takeaways from Indiana’s win over Ohio State

  • 01/10/2015 5:04 pm in

Indiana bounced back from a disappointing loss at Michigan State on Monday for its third win against a ranked opponent this season, 69-66 over No. 22 Ohio State. The win moved the Hoosiers to 12-4 overall and 2-1 in the Big Ten.

Here’s a look at five takeaways from the win over the Buckeyes:

· The Hoosiers bounced back, once again, from a loss: Just as it did following losses to Eastern Washington, Louisville and Georgetown, Indiana didn’t let a poor performance in its previous game carry over. Although the Hoosiers started slow on Saturday afternoon, Indiana controlled the game for most of the afternoon and its work on the glass was the primary difference.

Despite a size advantage in the front court for the Buckeyes, Indiana corralled 43.2 percent of its misses in the win and scored 19 second-chance points.

“After Louisville, we were plus nine in the rebound margin going into the Michigan State game,” Tom Crean said. “So we made really good improvements there and in that game we didn’t rebound it very well at all. We blocked out decently, but we didn’t go to the offensive glass. Today there was much more … we have to get more offensive rebounding. We have to be a gang rebounding team on both ends of the court.”

· “Good” Troy makes an appearance: Indiana sophomore Troy Williams was a no-show statistically in Monday’s loss to Michigan State going scoreless in 17 minutes and was benched for the game’s final 13 minutes. On Saturday, Williams was engaged early and often as he finished with 15 points and a career-high 12 rebounds.

He’s still an adventure to watch with the ball sometimes when he gets a full head of steam, but when he makes the simple play and lets his athleticism take over, he’s difficult to stop. Williams had a pair of ridiculous second half dunks that got the crowd into the game and afterward, he admitted lacking an “edge” going into the Michigan State loss.

“I would say my mindset was definitely different,” he explained. “Going into Michigan State I didn’t have the mindset I had going into this game. It was more just like, I was out of it, just didn’t have any edge to me.

“In this game and the practices that led up to this game, I decided that’s never going to happen again with me and I’m not going to let my team down again because I know who gives energy to my team the most. I just came into this game and brought energy to it.”

· Indiana’s bench play provides early spark: The Hoosiers fell behind 9-2 by the time the first media timeout arrived and it was IU’s bench that scored the next seven points to cut the Ohio State lead to just one by the 14:17 mark of the first half.

Collin Hartman scored his only basket of the game for IU’s second field goal and then Nick Zeisloft, who had scored just 12 points in the previous four games, hit a layup and a 3-pointer. Zeisloft finished with eight points in 23 minutes and Hartman had two points, six rebounds and three blocks in 24 minutes.

“That’s momentum, you never know where it’s going to come from,” Crean said. “And we needed some energy at the beginning of the game. Somebody has to establish their will early on in the game and Ohio State did and we didn’t match it and we go to the bench and we did.”

· Blackmon Jr. scores 16 of his game-high 18 in second half: Through 20 minutes, James Blackmon Jr. was struggling offensively. The freshman from Marion was just 1-of-5 from the field and had two points and three rebounds in 13 first half minutes.

But the second half was a different story as Blackmon Jr. hit a layup and a 3-pointer early that ignited him offensively. He would go on to finish with 18 points (on 6-of-13 shooting) and added seven rebounds. Postgame, Blackmon Jr. disputed the notion that he’s been in a slump recently.

“I don’t think it’s really a slump, I just have to do different things to get going,” he said. “Like today I hit the glass, started rebounding, and that got me going. I got a couple easy buckets and then I was back in rhythm. I think that’s what happened today.”

· Ferrell makes life uncomfortable for D’Angelo Russell: As we noted in our game preview, Ohio State freshman D’Angelo Russell came in averaging 19.3 points in Ohio State’s 13 wins and just 13.6 points in their three losses.

Indiana junior guard Yogi Ferrell didn’t play a great game offensively, but his defense on Russell, who shot just 3-of-15 from the field and finished with 13 points, was a game changer in the eyes of Crean.

“Yogi wants those challenges. He wants those – it doesn’t matter the size of the guy,” Crean said.  That’s how Victor (Oladipo) was. And you know, when you’re the best defender, you’ve got to go take that. We mix defenses and things of that nature, but the way D’Angelo Russell has been playing; and for us to know that we have to really plan on him and Marc Loving, I thought our guys handled it well.”

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  • IUBizmark

    Don’t have to go too far back to remember a game with that many misses…IU @ MSU. :-/

  • HoosierBuddy

    Yeah he took jbl out because of his 1 on 5 drive to the rim and got blocked he deserved to be benched. He had 2 open players that coulda knocked down a trey.

  • KmanCRK

    if Vic would’ve been 3 inches taller, he could’ve been a top 15 pick after his sophomore year. Big difference between 6-4 guard and 6-7.

  • Brock P

    Chad Ford has Troy Williams at No. 42. He needs a jump shot.

  • ForeverIU

    Told ya Wisconsin is beatable, but by Rutgers?

  • FinEndNow

    Brad Stevens, Shaka Smart, Archie Miller, Fred Hoiberg or Steve Wojciechowski would be my Top 5.

  • SilentBob

    Honestly I think our defense was very solid. Outstanding compared to what we have seen. We blanketed Russel most the game which causes him to throw cross court passes to an unready and out of sync Marc Loving. Part of that out of syncness can be given credit to our defense in the first half. A lot of Ohio States good shooting can be attributed to the drive and dish. We did a masterful (for our team) of taking that away.

  • Cm

    I think a majority would take Stevens right now, and most would be happy with the others. I’m just saying that getting rid of Crean without a definite plan would be unwise.

  • mark

    glad someone else sees what I see. It’s going to be hard to keep Hartman out of the starting lineup before his career here is done. Who ever thought we’d be saying this before the season? Great testimony to what he’s done and what’s possible for any kid who works hard and plays smart.

  • mark

    but don’t forget how HMP played just 2 games ago against Nebraska. CTC’s job is just to figure out who’s brought a better game between the two on any given night. But I agree that Holt seems to have more upside right now, if only because he always seems to play hard

  • mark

    amen. And what’s the use of being in the gym all the time if you can’t decide which hand you’re shooting with? Gotta settle on one and practice it like hell. Going back and forth means he’ll never be a truly good shooter with either hand. And those wild drives … besides his turnover problem, every wild shot he takes is equivalent to a turnover

  • mark

    If I’m an NBA scout, he needs to show me a LOT more to be a 1st-rounder. I mean, he still has hardly any perimeter game, despite our having been told he shot so many thousand of 3s over the summer. 6’7″ guys without any perimeter game rarely succeed in the NBA. He still doesn’t have a very good handle for the NBA level. His defense still is lacking at times. Right now he’s a gamble for an NBA team, perhaps a 2nd round pick at best. Maybe by the end of the year he can change that, who knows.

  • mark

    Amen Amen Amen. No way TW is a top 15 pick right now! 2nd round pick at best. Mediocre ballhandling skills, poor outside shooting beyond 15 feet, bad decisions, inconsistency, drug problems, defensive lapses. Come now, guys, let’s be objective.

  • mark

    maybe Charlotte would take him. they seem to love taking kids who aren’t ready

  • FinEndNow

    Right now he is a 2nd round pick. With a jump shot he is a Top 20 pick.

  • FinEndNow

    So if you have Steph Curry on your team and he’s went 4-5 in a short span… you’d be ok taking him out because the “hot hand” is a myth?

  • TomJameson

    Not to be offensive but, If I was a foot taller, had better basketball fundamentals, had a good jump shot and was deadly from 3 point range, and was a killer on defense, and was 40 years younger, I would be drafted this year too! LOL Point is the old woulda-coulda-shoulda game is kind of silly after a certain point. LOL

  • TomJameson

    No, he does not jump on EVERY shot fake. LOL I think it’s crazy when somebody makes something an absolute just to make a point about their opinion. Now, I agree that HMP needs to keep grounded a bit more, but he’s improving in that area since the start of the season. I think the officiating kind of “concentrates” on Hanner too much in the first minute and some “ghost” fouls get called which puts him in a bad position. I think maybe starting Holt and bringing hanner off the bench might get them both motivated a bit more. And maybe take some of the officials attention off of Hanner. As far as next year, I would bet that Hanner gets his share of minutes.

  • KmanCRK

    I think you are missing my point. Go back and look at the last 10-20 years of NBA drafts, and you’ll scratch your over head over and over again wondering why certain guys were drafted where they were. The NBA draft has always been about potential. especially the first round. All I’m saying is that “good Troy”, who’s been getting or been close to getting a double-double most games lately, is a freak of an athlete which the NBA loves. You can’t teach 6-7 with a 40+” vertical.

    Do I think he will be a top 15 pick, absolutely not. My original point was how great he is when Good Troy comes to play. But unfortunately, that isn’t who shows up every game.

  • KmanCRK

    I don’t believe he is either. But if he played every game like he does when Good Troy comes out to play and averaged 15pts, 10 rebounds, with his height and athleticism, NBA scouts would be drooling over him. But we know he doesn’t play like that every game…

  • CreamandCrimson

    This was our 3rd win over a Top 25 opponent this season, the rest of the B1G has 4 wins over Top 25 opponents…combined.

    This wasn’t perfect and it often wasn’t pretty. I will absolutely take it though. Well done Hoosiers. On to Tuesday night against Penn State.

  • TomJameson

    Oh I agree about the head-scratching part. Players get drafted on potential, but that potential is rated by people who are trying to get a specific type of talent for their team, to fill a need. My sarcastic and frivolous comment was triggered by the start of yours “If Vic would’ve been 3 inches taller…” That may be a true statement, but then so would be my sarcastic reply, LOL As far as Troy is concerned, I really hope he will be back next year. In my very humble opinion, he is the only threat to go to the NBA this year because of his “good Troy” half. So we agree, as long as you forgive my sarcasm. 🙂

  • INUnivHoosier

    Is Steph Curry on our team?

  • IU diehard from CT

    He cant shoot the ball and he is a 3 in the nba. What do 3’s do in the NBA? Shoot. He is not a pro

  • IU diehard from CT

    “Good Troy” still can’t shoot the ball. It’s ok to think very highly of an iu player, but saying he is a potential 1st round draft pick is in my opinion ridiculous.

  • John D Murphy

    I’ll throw in the guy at Utah (Krykowiac sp?). I’ve watched him resurrect that program from near the depths IU was at (near). His teams are so much more prepared.

  • John D Murphy

    Spot on! And I’ll add be ready to foul when when you are up 3 and the opponent has ball (you don’t always have to). Have players who you trust to make the foul without making it a 3 pt or 4 pt foul and who’ve read the scouting report on so they know who to foul. Take the headphones out on the plane and bus and go over the tactical situations.

  • John D Murphy

    Wings without jumpshots have to be lockdown defenders to be drafted in the 1st round.

  • John D Murphy

    He is not on the board at this point. The scouting services play out through the 2nd round. When in fact the bottom have of the 2nd round is usually deep prospecting (picking 19 yr Euro bigs who have no intention to play in the NBA for 3-5 years). There are really only about 45 spots available to guys who are expected to be on rosters. TW isn’t close yet. If he makes as much progress from so to jr as he has from fr to so, then we’ll talk.

  • John D Murphy

    The D is getting better. They are competing and working. I like that can win this type of ugly game. I think this year’s team has a lot more toughness and heart than last year’s. I think they will continue to improve.

  • IUMIKE1

    Drug problems, really ? He tests positive for weed one time and he doesn’t have a drug problem, he has drug problem”S”. You, I, and pretty much everyone else doesn’t even know what the positive level was, hell he could have just been around some people that were smoking and then was tested shortly afterwards, and please don’t launch into the, he should have took off running if that was the case.

  • IUMIKE1

    I don’t know about “studies” on how a player is handled when he is hot, but I’d be willing to bet if you watch actual games the vast majority of coaches aren’t going to pull a player because they have hit 4 or 5 shots in a row, with the thinking, the law of averages says he probably won’t hit the next one.

  • FinEndNow

    Chad Ford has Troy Williams 44th on his Top 100. Which puts him in the 2nd round/undrafted range. The scouting report on Troy is that if he had a jumpshot then he’d be a 1st rounder.

  • mark

    Yes, really. I guess you’re going to tell me next that he didn’t inhale, right? Er, no, he was “just around some people that were smoking…” What a joke.

  • KmanCRK

    Where did Ford have Olidipo at this point into his Jr. season? Spoiler alert, no where near #2.

  • IUMIKE1

    So a kid testing positive for weed, just once, is enough for someone like you, that has only that one fact to go on, to declare to the general public that he has drug problem”S”. That’s the only joke I see. Evidently your lack of tolerance when it comes to a young college kid beginning to live away from home for the first time, and in Bloomington, is surpassed only by your lack of knowledge when it comes to what you know about the subject of drug tests. I know, the reason that you don’t know about them is because you were never at an age where you were young enough that you made a bad choice that you later on regretted, right (dws) ? I did not state anything to be of fact, that is what you done. I only stated, since you or I neither one have all the facts, a possibility that could have been. If you think a person cannot spend an extended amount of time in a small enclosed area where a few people, that they are not even talking to, are smoking weed and not have a very low level positive test a day or two afterwards you are sadly mistaken. There are several other things that the test could have come back positive on that would be a whole lot more worrisome than weed, that’s for sure. He more than likely did inhale and more than once, but then again, you and I don’t know that for a fact do we ? Even if he did, do we jump up on the holier than thou stump and penalize a kid severely the first time he gets into a little bit of trouble ? That’s the joke part I guess IF that’s the way you see it. Should SR have gotten more of a penalty than he did, yes probably so, but then, again, we don’t know all of the details.

  • mark

    did I talk about “penalizing a kid severely”? All I said is that he had drug problems. I stand by that; the FACTS support it. If anyone is acting “holier than thou” here, it’s you.

  • IUMIKE1

    OK, so going on a public site and claiming a kid doesn’t just have a drug problem, but rather drug problem”S” isn’t acting holier than thou, got it, I think the vast majority, including our coaching staff, you know the ones with all the facts, would disagree with TW being labeled as having drug problems. Kind of hard to be labeled as the one acting holier than thou when I’m the one defending someone not here to defend himself and you’re the one putting incoherent labels on a 18 or 19 year old kid. The only FACTS you have is that he tested positive for weed ONE TIME, which hardly classifies him as having drug problems. You’re probably one of those that thinks there is no such thing as someone truthfully being helped by utilizing marijuana for medical reasons as well. Last time I checked we were no longer living in the 50’s or 60’s or even the 70’s, welcome to 2015.

  • mark

    IU Mike: If you put words into my mouth and extrapolate all kinds of things that were not said, then judge me accordingly, then you are acting “holier than thou.” Besides, this, if there were no “drug problem”, then why was he suspended? Finally Mike: I myself played my share of ball. I played against Bias, Dalrymple and Tony Bruin at the 5-Star Camp and the Syracuse camp; they all had their careers/lives derailed by drugs (also played against Johnny Dawkins, Billy Thompson and others who didn’t). Also played at elite playgrounds and college ball. There’s a ton of drug use going on, and if you honestly believe that one failed drug test only means the guy did it just once, then you’re living in the Twilight Zone. As for “living in our time”, can you please tell me what Is the intrinsic virtue of “our time”? Heck,, in the 20th century more people were killed via persecution and war than in any other century in world history, and it’s only getting worse in the current century, yet you assign some strange intrinsic virtue to “living in 2015” … just ask any older person if the world is getting better or worse, they’ll tell you: much, much worse. As for marijuana, how’s that legalization going in Colorado? What kind of results have there been? I rest my case.

  • IUMIKE1

    First let me say that I really hope that you take the time to read all of what I’ve typed, even with it being at long as it is. If you do I think you will possibly understand my stance and passion on this better, and respond as you wish, but I am done with the back and forth.

    I don’t believe I put any words into your mouth, if I did please tell me what words I directly attributed to you saying that you did not say. I did not say that you thought he should be punished severely. What I did say was, do we punish a kid severely for a first time positive test for weed. As for some of the other things I stated, they were possibilities that could have happened and not having all of the facts, regardless of the percentages, make them a possibility. Has TW smoked some weed more than once, chances are he has, but then again neither you nor I know that for a fact, do we, so, myself, I think I’ll wait till the facts are there before I label anyone on a public site as someone having drug problem”S”. Evidently you have a very different definition of drug “problem”. There is a big difference between someone having to deal with missing 4 games, one time, in their to date college career and someone having actual drug problem”S”. I think if he had what I, and most other sensible people would deem to be drug problem”S”, he would have tested positive at least one other time before he did and for things that are actually addictive and much more damaging. As fare as the legalization in CO is going, it’s going great last figure I seen was that it had raised over 39 million dollars in the direct tax on the sales of it alone, which has allowed them to put millions of dollars back into their schools and without having to raise taxes to do it. That number doesn’t even include the dollars being put into the economy from various other things putting money into their economy as a direct result of legalization. Then there is the fact that deaths from overdoses of legal opium based pain killers is down 25%. This is a matter that I have researched in great depth because my son has intractable epilepsy. I have had him to all the local experts, Mayo Clinic, John Hopkins and other places and the marijuana oil has been the only thing that has actually helped him. Almost all of the doctors have said, off the record of course, that they truly wished the laws were different, that the research doesn’t support the laws, the laws should be different and that as soon as they are changed, they intend to immediately prescribe it for numerous causes. Thanks to narrow minded lawmakers, in my home state, that have their pockets lined by Big Pharma, I risk being arrested for giving my son what is literally life saving medication that has none of the permanent side effects that the many drugs that failed him have, and all simply because of my zip code. I can sight you numerous other instances of where the legalization has had a positive effect as well, but I won’t unless you would like for me to. CO is utilizing a platform that some states have already modeled their’s after and all other states will eventually use some form of it to do the same thing. You say that you played high level bball and seen bad things happen to good players. While I may not have played at the level that you say you played at, I did however play a lot of bball and coached more than just a few games and while it wasn’t the NBA, it wasn’t ball at the Y or small town high school ball either, so I’ve been involved in a part or two of those scenarios also. I have seen what can happen when a kid is labeled as a druggie or as having drug problems and it stemming from just a small number of bad decisions. I have also seen what can happen when someone extends an unbiased hand out to that same kid that others wouldn’t touch because of the label or that the kid wouldn’t have anything to do with because he knew how the person perceived him to be and what kind of fairness that brought with it. As just one example, and there are plenty others of this kind as well, I took a kid in that had had that label hung on him and once I found out all of the details that surrounded the situation it made me even more aware of exactly how unjustly that label had been put on him. If the facts had been put out there for people, including myself, to hear they would have said, “yea, right, like I’m going to believe that”. After witnessing that situation first hand I learned to do my best to form my opinions off of only what I knew to, for sure, be facts and to understand that it’s not impossible that there could be other highly unusual facts that most, or no one else, is aware of. That person went on to rewrite his high school bball record book, obtain a scholarship at a school highly regarded for their bball program as well as their academics and graduated from that school with a teaching degree. He told me he took that route in hopes of giving some kid the same kind of chance and understanding that I did him.