Myles Brand: “I would like to see it at least two years”

mbrand23.jpgBack in April, I wrote about speculation that Myles Brand and David Stern were having dialogue about a change to the NBA’s age limit rule for the draft.

Our old friend Myles confirmed that speculation when he talked to The Dallas Morning News about the current rule and the changes he’d like to see made:

“I would like to see it at least two years. I did a CBS show with [NBA commissioner] David Stern in which we talked about this. I asked David how about two years, and he said ‘yes.’ He thought two years was better than one year, and I think two years is better than one. I think three is better than two, but I’ll take two. But of course he has to negotiate that with the NBA’s Players Union, and I think the contract is up in 2½ to three years, but he at least at that point expressed interest in exploring two years.”

This is a topic that’s only going to garner more attention now that Brandon Jennings has peaced out from Arizona and is headed east because he couldn’t enter the draft. Personally, my vote is to abolish this rule completely and let kids go straight to the NBA if they choose with one caveat: if a kid opts for college, he’s required to stay three years. This would allow the freedom of choice, but it also gives college coaches a chance to protect their programs from early entry candidates decimating their rosters.

{HT: FanNation}

  • peaychris

    Big Up to Big A… i love your proposal, and i cheer for Lute in Zona for being done with the one and dones… i loved you EJ but i long for the days where you could cheer for a player for 4 years and watch their games develop.

  • MikeinNC

    You are right on the money, I don't know why this has to be so complicated….let them go straight to the NBA if they want, if they want to opt for college, require a 3 year commitment. It seems to work fine for baseball (of course, they aren't trying to use the NCAA to pre-hype players and function as their free de facto minor leagues). I don't know why the NCAA has to be Stern's biatch on this….hold out for 3 years Myles.

  • msdiu81

    Let them go straight to the NBA if they want and if they go to college, let them go to the NBA or where ever when ever they want. If a kid doesn't like college for whatever reason, he should be able to leave and secure employment like any other kid going to college. Just remove the silly rule. As long as the rule is in place, I hope more go to Europe then fill our universities with one and dones.

  • http://bradzurcher.wordpress.com bz

    why reinvent the wheel. use the same rules as baseball. i know it's not just up to the ncaa, i know that the players union has a large say, but the mlbpa doesn't have a problem with it. shouldn't that carry some bargaining weight for the league to use against the union? one and dones will severely change the college game if allowed to continue. get rid of it.

  • Kelin Blab

    I agree 99% with Big A, but I say if they could go three years then they should commit to 4 years. If they opt to go to college….then GO TO COLLEGE and get a degree. Otherwise go straight to the pro's…if you can….or over seas….and let the college game be….

    I hope to enjoy watching Pritchard, Verdell, Roth, Hulls etc for the next four years and have a legit senior night, this is good for the game and the kids.

  • aceman07

    You guys have made a good point here. I played collegiate baseball and it was a tough decision whether or not to sign after high school or play college ball. Once the decision was made, though, it was no longer a concern for the next three years and it made the experience better. But the point made that really stood out to me is the that major league baseball has a deep farm league system which the NBA and NFL don't have the luxury of utilizing. Therefore, they need college teams to be their unofficial minor league systems to help develop players. If you take a look at collegiate draft choices into the MLB, they are usually big show ready much sooner than high school pickups for a reason. Why can't the the NBA recognize this and realize that players will be more capable of handling the physical play in the NBA and the mind games after they've ground out three seasons in a physical conference like the Big 10 or Big East???

  • student

    The whole reason this rule was put into effect was to save the NBA owners from mistakes like Kwame Brown or Jon Bender. They're not going to accept a baseball-like rule because there's no farm system set up like the MLB has. And no, the D league doesn't count; the NBA expects high draft picks to make an impact immediately. I think that 2 is definitely something good to settle for, and I really hope this trend of heading to foreign leagues ends soon.

  • Kelin Blab

    Off topic but Verdell Jones will be our leading scorer next year…..
    Nice you tube video of this kid in elementary school abusing youngsters….

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clL53T8jll0

  • HoosierSmitty

    Geez! That headline scared the life out of me. I thought he was talking about a postseason ban on the Hoosiers!

    I like Big A's proposal. I think that seems like an incredibly logical and reasonable solution. Which of course means that it'll never happen.

  • Kelin Blab

    Logic and NCAA don't belong in the same sentence.
    Does anyone realize by now the barnstorming tour would have began by now…thanks NCAA for further complicating my IU life…as if hoosier hysteria is not far enough away.

  • MikeinNC

    If Brand and Stern don't find a reasonable agreement, we may see the European leagues evolve into the defacto farm system for the NBA. Put the baseball rule in place. If the NBA wants kids straight out of college, make them build their own stinkin farm system.

  • B_MD

    I thought the same thing when I first logged on. I was actually was nervous to read the rest of the post and left the site. I then came back and read it as quite relieved:)

  • HoosierSmitty

    Honestly, if I was kid with the talent to play in the NBA right away and NO DESIRE to play college basketball, playing overseas would be incredibly appealing to me. I mean, could yo blame kids for wanting to get paid to experience life in other countries while still honing their skills. I certainly couldn't. Now, would they really be doing it for that reason? Certainly not, but it's not worse than the “I am excited to experience college” excuse that comes out of their mouths when they have to go to college instead of straight to the NBA.

    Make them come for three years or else go straight to the NBA.

    Other things that could work with some tweaks. Have a severe salary restrictions on players under the age of, oh say 22. They'd still make a ton of money, but maybe not so much to go completely buck wild with their crew. Require them to attend certain life skills training sessions, have an NBA/NCAA formed group that's sole purpose is to help these kids pursue a degree if they so desire, help them understand how to live in the real world, make solid financial decisions, etc.

  • http://matthewjenks.blogspot.com/ Matt_J

    More disturbing than Jennings jumping for the Euro leagues is this kid from Georgia Tech, Dixon I think his name is, who decided just to leave school early for the European Leagues. Basically, his logic was that he could stay in college and let the AD and the school president get rich off his talent while he prepared for the NBA, or he could go to Europe and get rich off his talent while he prepared for the NBA. That's a no brainer, and that's the thing that the school administrators and the NCAA should worry about more than Jennings jumping ship.

    Get rid of the rule all together. It was only ever there to protect NBA GMs from spending top dollar on talent that crapped out early, like Kwame Brown and others.

  • MikeinNC

    If Brand and Stern don't find a reasonable agreement, we may see the European leagues evolve into the defacto farm system for the NBA. Put the baseball rule in place. If the NBA wants kids straight out of college, make them build their own stinkin farm system.

  • BGleas

    I thought the same thing when I first logged on. I was actually was nervous to read the rest of the post and left the site. I then came back and read it as quite relieved:)

  • HoosierSmitty

    Honestly, if I was kid with the talent to play in the NBA right away and NO DESIRE to play college basketball, playing overseas would be incredibly appealing to me. I mean, could yo blame kids for wanting to get paid to experience life in other countries while still honing their skills. I certainly couldn't. Now, would they really be doing it for that reason? Certainly not, but it's not worse than the “I am excited to experience college” excuse that comes out of their mouths when they have to go to college instead of straight to the NBA.

    Make them come for three years or else go straight to the NBA.

    Other things that could work with some tweaks. Have a severe salary restrictions on players under the age of, oh say 22. They'd still make a ton of money, but maybe not so much to go completely buck wild with their crew. Require them to attend certain life skills training sessions, have an NBA/NCAA formed group that's sole purpose is to help these kids pursue a degree if they so desire, help them understand how to live in the real world, make solid financial decisions, etc.

  • http://matthewjenks.blogspot.com/ Matt_J

    More disturbing than Jennings jumping for the Euro leagues is this kid from Georgia Tech, Dixon I think his name is, who decided just to leave school early for the European Leagues. Basically, his logic was that he could stay in college and let the AD and the school president get rich off his talent while he prepared for the NBA, or he could go to Europe and get rich off his talent while he prepared for the NBA. That's a no brainer, and that's the thing that the school administrators and the NCAA should worry about more than Jennings jumping ship.

    Get rid of the rule all together. It was only ever there to protect NBA GMs from spending top dollar on talent that crapped out early, like Kwame Brown and others.

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