Rickerby named assistant athletic director for compliance

  • 07/22/2008 9:07 am in

rickerby.jpegAfter Chad Hawley backed out of the position, Indiana named Ian Rickerby assistant athletic director for compliance on Monday, according to The Indianapolis Star:

Rickerby replaces Jennifer Brinegar, who in June moved from compliance to recruiting and enrollment services. His annual salary will be $69,500.

Rickerby’s role during then-basketball coach Kelvin Sampson’s alleged violations of NCAA rules and their subsequent discovery is unclear. Rickerby was promoted from assistant soccer coach to director of compliance March 1, 2007. During that time, he was “responsible for acting as the primary contact for all constituents for rules interpretations, overseeing the monitoring of rules compliance and assisting with rules education,” IU said in Monday’s news release.

I would expect there to be a little bit of backlash to this decision, simply because Rickerby was on staff at IU when all of the Sampson stuff went down. Personally, as a subscriber to the “Sampson as a rogue actor” theory, I’m giving IU props for promoting from within. In our limited interactions with Rickerby, he’s been nothing short of a class act. Best of luck, Ian.

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  • BobbyDigital

    Hawley was set to make $105,000 per year and they're giving Rickerby $69,500? Ouch…

  • JerryCT

    MAkes you wonder ………………so how important is compliance to the AD ?

  • hoosier07

    never even heard of this guy … wonder if that's a good thing or a bad thing … hmmmm

  • tberry

    Where was “The Incredible Rickerby” during this entire fiasco? Supposedly Rickerby was “responsible for acting as the primary contact for all constituents for rules interpretations, overseeing the monitoring of rules compliance and assisting with rules education,” . The Star also says he was a high level person and a major player in the IU compliance Department.

    What all of this tells me is that there is some problem in the Athletic Department that knowledgeable compliance professionals want no part of. Evidently there are still unresolved problems that are not acceptable to someone from the outside.

    Looks like the only people who will take it are inside the system and know if the “F” it up they only have to worry about getting promoted. Being an insider he may be part of the problem rather than a solution.

  • JerryCT

    Concerns about an “inside person” should have been important to the administration as well. This to me is the most critical element, not whether its Hawley or Rickerby

    As a result I propose this job should be structured OUTSIDE the athletic dept for the next 3 years reporting DIRECTLY to IU President .

    In this way the position is NOT monitoring the very same dept he/she works for. Also this means job performance and compensation are not tools that can be used against the compliance officer to force him/her to “look the other way”.

    If working for the AD, when does this guy do a good job worthy of a bonus ?

    a. when he finds problems and reports them ?
    or
    b when overlooks them as we are recruiting a 5 star player ?

  • junkman

    I think the decision was made by Greenspan in an attempt to minimize expenditures, knowing that when the NCAA rules on the pending charges against IU that the entire department will be rebuilt…

    This is a very temporary solution.

  • B_MD

    This does seem like a weird position to have completely in-house. It's like he's the mole, except everyone already knows that he's the mole…That doesn't work.

  • JerryCT

    Yup ! To me it appears to be even worse when you place the position inside the AD and then ask about the following:

    1. What authority does the position have to compell access to records ?
    2. What authority to “sanction” a coach before violations get out of hand ?
    2. What budget and staff to investigate ? To design and implement systems ?
    3. Who resolves conflicts of opinion on compliance ?
    4. Who reports compliance to the NCAA ?

    Does the AD support the $700k/year coach he has invested his career in or the $70k/year compliance guy ? I recall KS threw the compliance staff under the bus blaming them for not notifying him of his own violations

    It seems to me compliance is better done by a position outside the AD or even by an outside private firm ( like an auditing firm ) which would be “untouchable” by the AD.

    Once outside the AD the position could be clearly incented and compensated based on “0” violations. No conlict would exist over whether the position hampers recruiting.

    For once the university might consider thinking outside the box

  • JerryCT

    After seeing the damage to IU basketball through lack of compliance this guy is not paid nearly enough to be an effective “mole” wherever the position is placed.

  • B_MD

    I agree. I think IU athletics is out of whack on a few of it's salaries. You're right on with your questions, “who does the ad side with the 700k coach of the 70k compliance director?”

    Another site posted the salaries of the athletic department and I was wondering how IU would ever expect to compete in football in a major conference when the football coach makes just 20k more than the women's basketball coach.

  • JerryCT

    An outside firm handling compliance could also be sued if IU is found to have violated NCAA rules and damages result.

    The firm's business insurance policy would probably settle the case enabling IU to pay off the offending coach to resign, taking pressure off of us alumns………….hmmmm……….maybe we could even turn a profit

  • I think it's as simple as the fact that Hawley has a law degree. It may not seem fair, but it's the same reason that law and business professors make more money than English and folklore professors: they have more opportunity to make more money elsewhere.

  • I think it's as simple as the fact that Hawley has a law degree. It may not seem fair, but it's the same reason that law and business professors make more money than English and folklore professors: they have more opportunity to make more money elsewhere.