Rob Senderoff talks about the hearings, his future

robsenderoff.jpgInstead of sneaking out of the back door without comment like our old friend Kelvin, former IU assistant Rob Senderoff actually showed his face out in Seattle during the NCAA hearings and yesterday, he spoke with David Carducci of The Record-Courier:

“I was glad to have the opportunity, but it was still an incredibly difficult process. First of all, having my integrity in question, and then having to read about it every day in the newspaper and online, and having what I thought was misinformation reported about me, it was all very difficult. With that being said, I put myself in the situation that allowed all of this to happen, and I can’t blame others for that. The way this has all been so public has just made it harder. But that’s part of working at Indiana.”

“My reputation up until (Indiana) had been spotless. And my reputation from this point on will be spotless. But I have to work doubly hard to cleanse my reputation now. I built a reputation through 12 years of doing things the right way. That has been destroyed. It is gone. And now I’m starting at ground zero again, and I have to prove myself even beyond what I’ve done before because now there is a perception that I do things wrong. And I’m not going to do anything wrong from this point forward. Going through this process has taught me how important it is to dot every “i’ and cross every “t.’ I am going to have to live with all of this forever. Even if the ruling (by the NCAA) is in my favor, I still did some things wrong, and I’m going to have to live with that.”

It’s nice to see Senderoff, unlike Sampson, is taking some accountability for what went down. Listen, the guy made some bad decisions, but the fact that he’s standing up and taking blame should be good for something, right? I’ve met Rob a couple of times and he’s one of the nicer guys in coaching. Here’s to hoping he gets things going in the right direction despite the carnage he left behind in Bloomington. As for Kelvin, well, that’s a different story.

  • NC Fat Boy

    If he was clean for 12 years, did he forget the rules???

  • http://www.cannotfalter.com tacojohn

    Either Sampson fostered the worst atmosphere of rules compliance ever, or Senderoff's reputation is not going to get repaired.

    Although it very well could be both.

  • hoosier07

    I know rob is probably the nicest person from the KS era. i hope he escapes this as cleanly as possible, and the repercussions do not follow him back to Kent….

  • http://www.insidethehall.com Alex

    Senderoff was the fall guy, in my opinion. Most people I've talked to agree that he was acting under instructions from Sampson.

  • bahickma

    I'm really glad Coach Senderoff came forth and at least admitted his part in some of this. If you need a reminder of how an assistant can be black-balled by head coaches for going against his head coach, look at Bruce Pearl while he was an assistant at Illinois. He turned his coach in and had to coach at USI for like 8 years.

  • hoosierfan27

    Wrong. Pearl was never a coach at Illinois. He was an asst. at Iowa and dug up some information about the Illinois coaching staff bribing players to go to Champaign. He then “snitched” on Illinois and that is why they still dislike him to this day. It would be very hard to find a coach that would turn in someone he works under to destroy his own team.

  • MikeinNC

    So was he in a situation where we caved to pressure from Sampson to cut corners and didn't have the courage to say no? Was this job at Indiana his first step up to an assistant's role at a big time program? That might have created a situation where he was more vulnerable to pressure from Sampson to break a rule….but it's hard to know what really happened because McCallum and the other guy walked away untarnished.

    He does sound like a guy that understands what he did wrong, and recognizes what he must do in the future, unlike Sampson who is taking the weasel approach.

  • http://www.cannotfalter.com tacojohn

    That's not what I've heard. The version of events I have paints Senderoff as willing and ready to break the rules, and with a pretty poor attitude about it in private when he was caught.

    My opinion, based on what I know, is that at best Senderoff was acting under instruction from Sampson but he didn't exactly need his arm twisted to break the rules.

  • http://www.insidethehall.com Alex

    I wouldn't agree with that, but then again, it's not worth arguing over.

    Both guys broke the rules and one is taking the blame for it like a man.

  • ALH_00

    Senderhoff's admissions show some contrition on his part. It's always admirable when people take accountability for their mistakes, because it is not always easy. I also hope this situation does not completely destroy this guy's coaching career.

    On the other hand, his “taking some of the blame” will never make up for his direct participation in the destruction of IU's storied basketball program. So while it is refreshing to hear him take responsibility, as an IU alum and fan, it will be a LONG time before I'm willing to forgive and forget.

  • tberry

    Do any of you really believe that he was spotless before IU and then, all of a sudden, he turned cheat. The only difference before IU and during IU is that he wasn't caught before IU.

    The old cliché still holds true, “Look at what someone does not what they say, if you want to know what they really believe,”

  • http://www.fearfullyoptimistic.com tacojohn

    That's not what I've heard. The version of events I have paints Senderoff as willing and ready to break the rules, and with a pretty poor attitude about it in private when he was caught.

    My opinion, based on what I know, is that at best Senderoff was acting under instruction from Sampson but he didn't exactly need his arm twisted to break the rules.

  • http://www.insidethehall.com Alex

    I wouldn't agree with that, but then again, it's not worth arguing over.

    Both guys broke the rules and one is taking the blame for it like a man.

  • ALH_00

    Senderhoff's admissions show some contrition on his part. It's always admirable when people take accountability for their mistakes, because it is not always easy. I also hope this situation does not completely destroy this guy's coaching career.

    On the other hand, his “taking some of the blame” will never make up for his direct participation in the destruction of IU's storied basketball program. So while it is refreshing to hear him take responsibility, as an IU alum and fan, it will be a LONG time before I'm willing to forgive and forget.

  • tberry

    Do any of you really believe that he was spotless before IU and then, all of a sudden, he turned cheat. The only difference before IU and during IU is that he wasn't caught before IU.

    The old cliché still holds true, “Look at what someone does not what they say, if you want to know what they really believe,”

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