Trey Lyles talks recruitment process, future

Former Indiana 2014 verbal commitment Trey Lyles met with a small pool of media on Friday at Indianapolis Tech to discuss his decision to reopen his recruitment.

Below are quotes from the junior-to-be on a variety of topics surrounding his recruitment, future and what he’s looking for in a program.

On why he chose to open his recruitment: 

I committed at a young age and I just really wanted to get out and be able to see other schools, re-think everything and go through the process of being recruited (because) I really didn’t get a chance when I was younger.

On how he arrived at the decision: 

Me and my dad talked about it a lot and really just being able to go through the process for me was a big part of it. I wanted to be able to have the experience, it’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Me and my dad and my mom talked about it, Coach Delaney, and we just came to the conclusion on Monday.

On the interest of other schools:

I’m really not focused on that, just getting ready for the season. But once the season starts, maybe (I’ll) start looking into some schools, really start accepting calls and texts from other coaches. But right now I’m just really staying in contact with Indiana still.

On the number of schools contacting him now:

I really don’t know. I’ve been hearing a lot, reading a lot on Twitter, but really I don’t know the exact number. I haven’t really spoke to them directly, my dad’s probably spoke to some of them, but to me directly it’s not happened yet.

On what’s important to him as he opens up to other schools:

Going to a school that’s going to get me prepared to play in the NBA because I want to play in the NBA, of course, everybody does. Not only just play, but be able to dominate in the NBA and really just get me life lessons and push me to be a better person, a better basketball player.

Where Indiana stands and what he still likes about the program:

They’re still No. 1. Great fan base, great history. Good coaches and of course great players that have passed through there. They have a good system and they really look out for their athletes.

On a potential new timeline:

I have no idea. This is just like the third day, so I really haven’t been able to give it that much thought. So it’s probably not going to be for a while.

On how tough it’s been:

It’s tough when you see things that people send to you on Twitter, mention you, call you out and all that stuff, that’s kinda tough. But it’s just people talking and you just have to let it go in one ear and out the other. It’s not really been that hard.

On whether it’s a possibility he could end up at the same school as James Blackmon Jr. and JaQuan Lyle: 

It might be. You know, if we continue playing together on the same AAU team, we could end up maybe going to the same school. We haven’t really talked about it like that, JaQuan’s kind of in his own wonderland, but if it were to happen it’d be good.

On his decision to take visits potentially during this upcoming high school season:

I’ll probably take unofficial visits, of course. Probably not take my official visits until senior year.

On whether the social media reaction surprised him:

My dad talked to me about it, he knew there was going to be an outlash. It really hasn’t affected me in a negative way. I knew people were going to be angry, upset about it, but I was 14 years old — I’m not going to say I didn’t know what I was doing — but I was young.

On whether he understands not every IU fan is like that:

Some IU fans were wishing me good luck wherever I go. There’s some that hate me because I de-committed. I just have to take it as it goes.

On whether he looks at how other schools are developing big men:

I look at how they develop all their players. How many people they have going into the draft. How many people that came out are actually doing stuff in the league.

On researching the NBA component of schools:

Just really how they preform during college games, if they are playing above the level of competition or if they’re just going out there and blending in.  And of course when they get in the NBA, if they’re making an instant impact. And then second and third year really taking off as a player.

On his decision to re-open instead of staying committed and looking around:

Definitely being up front. I didn’t want to go behind any backs. Even if the coaches knew, I didn’t think it’d be a good setting for it. Opening it up, it really didn’t give me any stop signs on what I can’t do like I would if I was committed. Being uncommitted I can go out and see any schools I want.

On his summer and adidas Nations:

The summer was really packed with stuff; I really didn’t get that much off time. Of course adidas Nations was good like it always is. Competed against high-level talent, guys from other countries and (I) really just enjoyed it.

On the difference between this summer and last summer:

Adidas Nations I definitely feel like I performed better this year than last year. Last year I was really young with the older guys. Spiece, I really didn’t get a lot of opportunity to play with the 17s. This year, I was one of the core guys on the team. If I didn’t play well, we might not win the game. So I really had to step up as a leader and as a player and just go out there and try to dominiate every game. On the Canadian team, being the new guy, they didn’t know what I was about. Really just going in there and showing that I’m a player just like they are and they really opened up to me.

  • Hammer

    Do you thinks “Its all about the money and how fast this kid can go pro”?

  • HoosierTrav

    Eric Gordon just made a sweet paycheck. That’s pretty alluring. Keep Blackmon and he’ll be back.

  • WisconHoosier

    I thought so, too, but it’s actually too expensive for most.

    Athlete injury disability costs around $10,000 to $15,000 per one million $$ of coverage. Not a lot of kids can afford $50,000 + for $5 million of coverage.

    The NCAA requires the schools to pay medical costs, but nothing for future earnings (disability).

    (And as a footnote to my original post: I think kids should stay in college. I was just pointing out the sales pitch we fight against when it comes to elite players.)

  • WisconHoosier

    I thought so, too, but it’s actually too expensive for most.

    Athlete injury disability costs around $10,000 to $15,000 per one million $$ of coverage. Not a lot of kids can afford $50,000 + for $5 million of coverage.

    The NCAA requires the schools to pay medical costs, but nothing for future earnings (disability).

    (And as a footnote to my original post: I think kids should stay in college. I was just pointing out the sales pitch we fight against when it comes to elite players.)

  • jmfriedman

    HIS future is bright no matter where he goes. Just don’t make a decision to use college as a worthless stepping stone before you understand that there is more value to it than a place you have to bunk for a year. If he understands that already and doesn’t care, then so be it.

    How many of those kids you say “made sacrifices” are in rehab, druggies, already broke, dead, miserable, etc,etc. You think missing out on part of their lives was worth it for them? You think the lack of growing up a bit is at least a part of the reason for their problems? I, for one, do,

    The bottom line – It is his choice. He has earned that. He will be in the NBA whether he plays one year or four. It doesn’t really matter if he plays at IU, UK, or Ball State for that matter, so don’t act as if I am crucifying the kid for decomitting from IU.

  • MillaRed

    Bad mouthing? What are you talking about? Read and interpret before you write.

  • b_side

    Apologies in advance to those uninterested in my rant.

    I never implied that you were crucifying Trey. Simply stating a point that athletes, especially African-Americans, are held to different standards. It’s a shame and bears constant reminding for an impassioned fan base like ours.

    I do think we put Cody too high on a pedestal though. What if Cody declares for the draft after his Sophomore year before graduating…what’s the difference between one and done vs. two and through?

    Either way, both he and Trey are leaving early. Both players are missing out on the full college experience. Neither player gets a degree (yet) prior to being drafted. Both players will have (or would have) used IU as a stepping stone to fulfill their dreams of playing professionally.

    But saying “in reality, if the NBA is his biggest priority, then maybe IU doesn’t need his services” is wishful thinking. Crean does a masterful job of recruiting top flight talent just like Trey mixed with 3-4 year players.

    We will not maintain our return to the blueblood programs without players whose biggest priority is the NBA. Sure Cody is loving his experience at IU and is a great student to boot, but getting to the NBA is also his biggest priority much like Trey’s. Cody may not voice it in the media like Trey, but his drive is one and the same.

    Re: the players who are “in rehab, druggies, already broke, dead, miserable, etc” please back it up with some stats before drawing such outlandish generalizations. I would love for you to take a wild guess at the proportion of troubled professionals who struck it rich at a young age (athletes, actors, musicians, etc) vs. those doing just fine and dandy. This is not some kind of epidemic, but rather major media entities seeking ratings, page views, etc. To put some context around my point, producing fluff pieces about the typical NBA role player earning 6-7 figures who has it together doesn’t generate an audience vs. the few Antoine Walkers who bottom out.

  • SS8941

    I don’t care if you’re fourteen years old or seventy years old. If you commit to something, then you must do it. Unfortunately people’s word means nothing today because kids are not taught to honor their own word.

  • ScoopGeoff

    Hard to compare Cody to Trey… Trey doesn’t have two brothers already in pro basketball and earning bank. I don’t know Trey’s family finances, but I know the Zellers are a comfortable species.

  • jmfriedman

    1)Cody is on pace to get his degree in 2 and a half years-he will have a degree, and two more years of “growing up” on his own under his belt, which is invaluable to a young man before thrown into an NBA career with all of the career and financial pressures involved.

    2)I am not “wishful thinking” to say we may not want Trey on the team if all he wants is NBA. It can be a cancer to your team to have a kid like that (not saying this about Trey because I don’t personally know him, but it is possible) and I don’t think the “Kentucky way” is what I want to represent my school and is not a long term recipe for success IMO. I don’t want it at IU- you may. I wouldn’t trade one kid like Zeller for 100 Derrick Roses.
    3) 78% of NFL players are broke within 2 years of leaving the league- was posted on Dr. Phil yesterday during the Terrell Owens episode. T.O. is broke by the way – blew 60 million dollars- Here are a few notable NBA guys who are broke–Allen Iverson, Jason Caffey, Dennis Rodman, Kenny Anderson, Eddy Curry, Derrick Coleman, Shawn Kemp, Vin Baker, Latrell Sprewell, Scottie Pippin-and many more Look it up – they made form 30 M to 120 M in their careers, so believe it, you can blow it. It isn’t all NBA guys of course, but you get the point. A little college education on finances and some personal growth in the responsibility department may have come in handy.
    You added “young celebrities that have sacrificed youth” in your post as a comparison. I don’t think I need to make a list of all of the problems there.

    MY whole point is that he is making an uninformed decision AGAIN -in my opinion- That is his reason for changing his mind on his commitment, right? He shouldn’t worry about going one and done until he is, at least, a senior in high school= that 18 year old point in life you mentioned.
    You may not see any value in going to college to learn to take care of yourself and become responsible for your actions without daddy or mommy telling you what you should do and think. I know there are success stories of basketball players who don’t get broke, etc, but many of them missed out on that part of life and act like complete spoiled brat babies-Hmmm Dwight Howard anyone?
    I am not gonna argue anymore- I have made my point… again

  • b_side

    Give me a break. What about coaches who leave a program for a better paying gig? They recruited said teenager. This is not a problem of today’s youth, but rather a problem with NCAA athletics.

  • b_side

    You brought up the NFL, completely different argument and one I am completely aware of. But the business model of lower paying salaries combined with non-guaranteed contracts makes the league an anomaly vs. the other major sports leagues. Well that, and of course, the issue of concussions and post-career health issues.

    That list of former players who are “broke” is all well and good, but there are 480 players in the NBA every year. Obviously there is serious overlap. But then you have to consider the 6,700 earning a living in foreign countries playing professionally over the last five years as well (source: USABasketcom as of Aug. 2012).

  • http://twitter.com/Peyton_Nikol96 Peyton Webb

    He wants to experience the process of being recruited..That simple…The negative Indiana fans just need to relax, these are the best days of Treys life, enjoy the process and we’ll see you in B’TOWN Trey!

  • http://twitter.com/Peyton_Nikol96 Peyton Webb

    He wants to experience the process of being recruited..That simple…The negative Indiana fans just need to relax, these are the best days of Treys life, enjoy the process and we’ll see you in B’TOWN Trey!

  • Derbus

    Cody is NOT on pace to get a business degree from the IU Kelley School of Business in 2.5 yrs – what r u smoking?! I am quite confident he tested out or had High School credits already for many undergrad courses. We all hope he will finish his degree after his Junior season, any sooner and he must be attending classes at pUKe!!!

  • SCHoosier

    wow..if that’s the case..I had a few teenage girls long ago who thought I’m a real jerk:)

  • SCHoosier

    Unfortunately I think you are correct in the “not coming” analysis. Hope I’m wrong..my wife will be happy to tell you that being wrong b reaks no new ground for me!

  • AJ_IU_ColtsFan

    It may be fine to say that in principle. But there’s a reason minors are not granted the status to commit to things such as legal contracts, and that’s because society recognizes that young kids don’t have the experience, perspective, or developed mentality to truly recognize what’s in their best interests. They may get things right by accident – such as Lyles picking Indiana before he’s even gotten through his first year of high school – but that doesn’t mean they’ve truly, fully thought things through.

    Trying to hold a fourteen year old to a major life commitment is presuming that such a young kid has the maturity to make such a decision to begin with. That’s folly. The real world has taught us why minors should be protected against their own, young, not yet fully experienced decisions, and trying to hold such youths to such major promises defies what society has learned over time. Society recognizes the need to let the young develop and mature before they take on major responsibilities. Yet, an exception should be made here simply because it’s Indiana basketball?

    The real lesson here is that the NCAA needs to create rules against such early commitments.

    The second one is that people need to relax over his decision. IU has lost major recruits before – anyone remember a kid from decades ago named Larry Bird? He even made it to campus before leaving – and has managed to withstand it. People need to understand that it’s not any single recruit that makes or breaks the program’s reputation, but rather it’s the consistency of success and behavior that people will base their opinions on. Getting hung up on the decisions of one kid – one who hasn’t ruled IU out, by the way – is acceding to the notion that a single individual is of paramount importance to the program. That notion stands in contradiction to the entire notion of team building and teamwork, and as such is antithetical to the values any good program should hold.

    Lyles would be a great addition. But not so great that people should abandon rational principle in order to retail arguments about why he should stay. It’s a mistake to start arguing that a fourteen year old kid should be held to the same standard as a seventy year old adult. The fact that it’s in the context of recruits promises to a basketball program doesn’t change that.

  • AJ_IU_ColtsFan

    It may be fine to say that in principle. But there’s a reason minors are not granted the status to commit to things such as legal contracts, and that’s because society recognizes that young kids don’t have the experience, perspective, or developed mentality to truly recognize what’s in their best interests. They may get things right by accident – such as Lyles picking Indiana before he’s even gotten through his first year of high school – but that doesn’t mean they’ve truly, fully thought things through.

    Trying to hold a fourteen year old to a major life commitment is presuming that such a young kid has the maturity to make such a decision to begin with. That’s folly. The real world has taught us why minors should be protected against their own, young, not yet fully experienced decisions, and trying to hold such youths to such major promises defies what society has learned over time. Society recognizes the need to let the young develop and mature before they take on major responsibilities. Yet, an exception should be made here simply because it’s Indiana basketball?

    The real lesson here is that the NCAA needs to create rules against such early commitments.

    The second one is that people need to relax over his decision. IU has lost major recruits before – anyone remember a kid from decades ago named Larry Bird? He even made it to campus before leaving – and has managed to withstand it. People need to understand that it’s not any single recruit that makes or breaks the program’s reputation, but rather it’s the consistency of success and behavior that people will base their opinions on. Getting hung up on the decisions of one kid – one who hasn’t ruled IU out, by the way – is acceding to the notion that a single individual is of paramount importance to the program. That notion stands in contradiction to the entire notion of team building and teamwork, and as such is antithetical to the values any good program should hold.

    Lyles would be a great addition. But not so great that people should abandon rational principle in order to retail arguments about why he should stay. It’s a mistake to start arguing that a fourteen year old kid should be held to the same standard as a seventy year old adult. The fact that it’s in the context of recruits promises to a basketball program doesn’t change that.

  • AJ_IU_ColtsFan

    Folks, I have a point of perspective on this whole issue: What would be worse for IU? Lyles choosing to go elsewhere? Or Lyles feeling pressure/responsibility/whatever to go to Bloomington, then choosing to transfer later? Neither are good, but one’s comparable to a broken engagement, whereas the other is akin to a full-on divorce. Neither are good, but the second is an order of magnitude worse.

    Let the guy think it through. You don’t want him to go to IU unless he really, fully decides that he wants this himself. It’ll be much worse for both him and us if he makes his decision on anything less than 100% certainty and ends up wanting to transfer.

  • AJ_IU_ColtsFan

    Yeah, and I’ve got some seventy year ol…. wait. WAIT!!! >:-(

  • ScoopGeoff

    Another reason the NFL comparison is a bad one… There are very few players that don’t go to AT LEAST 3 years of college before entering the draft. A very good percentage stay 4 years, whether they get their degree or not.

    And then they still go broke, for many of the reasons b_side said and more.

    I have looked hard for study that broke down bankruptcy issues with basketball players by race and by number of years of college completed. I cannot find it.

    I don’t want to see it to make a racial statement about the players themselves, but I think their is a huge cultural gap in what is expected of black players when they make it big. I think many are raised, not by their parents, but culturally and through peer pressure to become a “balla”. I think their is extreme pressure from friends and family to help them out financially. Not all, but certainly a much higher % of black players than white players, have to support not only themselves, but a posse of friends that they now employ for various “jobs”. I truly believe there are more stressful cultural pressures on black players.

    Although college can prepare you for many things, I don’t think it can prepare you for extreme lifestyle shock they experience when they enter the league. In 4 years of college you can’t learn how to responsibly go from having $100 in your checking account to having $2,000,000. There’s no degree in Teammate Management, that teaches you how to cope with your new peers driving nice cars, owning nice homes, wearing nice clothes and jewelry, and going out to expensive restaurants and clubs. How about the superstar on your team with a max contract that has 3 homes, 5 diamond-studded Rolexes, a Bentley, and a Lambo, and a Rover, and a custom Ducati, and just bought his aunt a house next to the one he bought for his mom so they could knit together. Is there a Masters program that teaches you how to handle the 10 hot groupies that are waiting for you in every town after every game? And what if one or two of those doctored the condom or (oops) forgot to take their birth control?

    There are are just a lot of things that need to be instilled as values from a very young age that you can’t expect college to prepare guys for. If a 23 year old college grad wasn’t raised a certain way at home they are going to be extremely susceptible to all the above pressures.

  • HoosierTrav

    Its obvious that his father is seeing the dollar signs here. Hopefully after a few seasons in which IU enjoys more success than Kentucky, he will reconsider. Derrick Rose, Tyreke Evans, Marcus Camby, John Wall, Anthony Davis, MKG, Terrence Jones, and others were not going to jeopardize their lofty draft status’ by being coached by anyone other than Calipari. These recruits need to realize this. Dont buy into that bs. What would Cal do with the likes of a High School Sheehey, Oladipo, & CWat? Crean DEVELOPS PRO’S!!!! Dwayne Wade was a 3 Star!!! A 3 Star! Imagine what he’d do for guys who have the one and done abilities? Oh wait….. Cody Zeller! I forgot about him. How dare I! He was a lottery pick last season and look at his improvement. Trey, you’re going to the NBA whether you go to IU, UK, Or Ivy Tech. Come to IU and be remembered and revered for the rest of your life. Or become just another basketball player who is from Indiana and in the NBA. Cal isn’t going to give you an edge in your life. That advantage is w/ Crean and Hoosier Nation! They will love you temporarily and we will love you unconditionally bc you’re one of OUR own. I hope his father doesnt limit his ability to look at his situation this way. Few things disgust me as much as that parent that tries to use their child to their individual benefit. If he goes to UK, we’ll kick his ass up and down the court. Hes not the only 5 star in the country who is considering the candy stripes. Also, remeber this: By the time he suits up in college, Yogi, Jeremy, Ron, Hanner and Peter will all be Juniors and Stan the man and Luke I am your father will be Super sophs…….SOOOOOOO Good Luuuck!

  • Ronc99

    Hey Trey, this IU fan wishes you the best in whatever decision you make. If I were in your shoes, I would have done the same thing. Being totally aware of all your options is the only way to succeed in life. Best wishes!

  • donoharmtoday

    I appreciate your opinion on my post which I see has been taken down. You have your opinion and I have mine. And he is still not coming to IU. We all “wish” he would. I “wish” he would. I “wish” him the best.

  • donoharmtoday

    I appreciate your opinion on my post which I see has been taken down. You have your opinion and I have mine. And he is still not coming to IU. We all “wish” he would. I “wish” he would. I “wish” him the best.

  • adam

    grown adults demonstrating animosity towards a 16 year old for a decision the 16 year old made when he was 14. lets try not to embarrass ourselves please. IU will be fine sans trey. like the rest of you i would have liked to see him remain committed to our fine school, but that isnt in the cards right yet. please try not to act like the high schoolers we arent and refrain from hating on an actual high schooler.

  • FreeAgentID

    Come to the Hoosiers Trey!

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