Jabari Parker has high praise for IU commit Lyles

FORT WAYNE, Ind. — As the consensus No. 1 player in the class of 2013, Chicago Simeon and Mac Irvin Fire forward Jabari Parker gets the best shot from his competition every night in high school and AAU play.

That was certainly the case on Saturday morning at Spiece Fieldhouse as the Parker-led Mac Irvin Fire squared off with Trey Lyles and Spiece Indy Heat in the marquee pool play matchup of the 2012 Bill Hensley Memorial Run-N-Slam Classic.

Parker’s game-high 23 points were too much for Indy Heat to overcome as Mac Irvin prevailed 70-58, but afterward Parker delivered a glowing endorsement for the future IU forward.

“The guy is so deceptive,” Parker told Inside the Hall of Lyles. “He can play out on the perimeter and also in the post. So that makes him so special at his size, being so big, because he’s so versatile.”

Saturday morning’s meeting between Lyles and Parker isn’t the first time the two have crossed paths.

They’ve been on the court together before for USA Basketball and also at last October’s John Lucas Camp in Louisville. As Lyles continues to develop his game, Parker sees just one peer who is a comparable at his size.

“Just one other guy, Julius Randle from my class, that’s all,” Parker said. “The 6-9 position is so dangerous because they have height, but can also put the ball on the floor. So that makes it scary for those guys that they have to play against.”

Lyles finished with 13 points against a Mac Irvin Fire frontline that included Parker, Jahlil Okafor (No. 2 nationally in 2014) and Tommy Hamilton (No. 42 nationally in 2013).

Lyles’ high school coach at Indianapolis Tech, Jason Delaney, said Saturday he believed the opportunity to play against a talent like Parker will only drive Lyles to become even better.

“In Indiana, it’s hard because we have the 300 mile rule that we can’t travel outside of,” Delaney said. “So trying to get a Chicago Simeon or Whitney Young to come play us is difficult at times. So we don’t always get to play against the national players. The AAU setting gives him a chance to play against those players and see where he is right now and compete at that high level. That’s the great thing about what he gets to do right here.”

Lyles, who said he was disappointed with Indy Heat’s effort on defense against Mac Irvin Fire, was appreciative of Parker’s praise.

“It just shows that you’re up there with the elite guys and that you can play with anybody,” he said. “It’s a good measuring stick (playing against Parker). We go hard at each other every time we play and really just challenge each other to play at our best. It’s good competition.”

  • spiderman0551

    Trey would have had a better game but their guards were making the Spiece guards works their butts off just to get the ball down court. Not a lot of passing either. Trey didn’t touch the ball much in the second half. Talked to his Mom in the last game he played and she said he was a little frustrated with how the weekend was playing out. He played great in the last game but (25 and 10 according to Mom) the Wisconsin team hit about 20 3 pointers. Trey, when he got the ball, couldn’t be stopped. He’s going to be special.

  • 888

    The recruiting publications should listen to the players somewhat about whos really the real deal. No way Trey shouldnt be in the top 3 in 2014. If Parker says theres only one guy comparable and hes a year older thats saying something about where Treys at being a junior to be. Like Cody Trey will be huge for IU recruiting going forward. Big guys pay attention to schools that send players to the NBA.

  • Oldguyy

    I wish you wouldn’t remind me about a Wisconsin team hitting about twenty three-pointers. That BT Tourney game hurt!

  • MitchellBMitch

    Are you serious with this comment? National scouts should listen to high school kids, ages 15-18, when making their rankings decisions? You have once again found a way to be more ridiculous and illogical than I could have imagined.

  • MitchellBMitch

    Are you serious with this comment? National scouts should listen to high school kids, ages 15-18, when making their rankings decisions? You have once again found a way to be more ridiculous and illogical than I could have imagined.

  • HoosierTrav

    I don’t think that they should necessarily listen primarily to the players. But when some of the top talent in the nation have higher regard for some than the scouts, it should be considered. i was there and there is NO WAY Jahlil Okafor is better than Trey. He’s a better rebounder. That’s it! Hes ranked #2 in 2014. Trey is much more talented than that kid. The scouts are missing something there.

  • IUMIKE1

    First thing that come into my mind too. My jaw is still not unclinched all the way.

  • iufan4life10

    I agree, in a perfect world, they should account for what other players think of the recruits but that would be really difficult to keep track of. Lyles is a beast and will be in the top 10 of the 2014 class. On some of the stuff written about him I have seen such things as “it’s hard to believe 7 players in this class are better than Lyles.” Parker’ comments just reaffirms the kid is going to be great. I would much rather hear this praise from other players than scouts.

  • iufan4life10

    I agree, in a perfect world, they should account for what other players think of the recruits but that would be really difficult to keep track of. Lyles is a beast and will be in the top 10 of the 2014 class. On some of the stuff written about him I have seen such things as “it’s hard to believe 7 players in this class are better than Lyles.” Parker’ comments just reaffirms the kid is going to be great. I would much rather hear this praise from other players than scouts.

  • NaplesHoosier

    Alex,
    Have you heard what kind of conversation Noah Vonleh had with CTC about the offer IU made him for 2014 class? I was wondering what kind of interest he was showing as he is from the northeast i believe. Any comments are appreciated.

  • FreeAgentSignee

    Welcome and good luck Trey Lyles!

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