Spring Scouting: Hanner Perea

Inside the Hall continues our series of spring scouting reports this morning with 2012 commitment Hanner Perea.

(Previously: James Blackmon Jr., Trey Lyles, Mark Donnal, Jaquan Lyle)

After watching Indiana Elite games at the IndyBall.com Shootout, Spiece Run ‘N Slam and the adidas May Classic as well as reviewing video of the Denver Double Pump, here are our thoughts on the 6-foot-8, 210-pound native of Colombia:

– Athleticism and finishing ability: From the first time we saw Perea play in the summer of 2009, it was clear that his athletic ability stood above nearly all of his peers. And with that athletic ability, the 2012 IU commitment has established himself as one of the top finishers in the country. It’s not uncommon for video cameras to start rolling in warmups as Perea typically puts on a display of dunks (like this one) that will leave you scratching your head. After a game at the IndyBall.com Shootout in early April, Yogi Ferrell commented that he basically just had to “throw it up there” and Perea would grab the ball and finish. This is a pretty accurate representation of how things work with Perea as he can quickly turn what seems like an errant pass into a bucket.

– Improving defender: Perea is a solid shotblocker, but can get himself in foul trouble at times by leaving his feet on attempts where he’d be better served standing straight up. That said, his length coupled with his athleticism and quickness can make him a nightmare to score on in the paint. His upper body strength should allow him to step right into the paint and make a difference in a physical Big Ten. And as his instincts and understanding of the game continue to improve, he should be able to step out and effectively guard the perimeter from time-to-time.

– Developing offensive game: Besides scoring off of dunks and alley-oops, Perea gets the majority of his points via putbacks. He’s been effective this spring on the offensive glass and for the most part, does a nice job of immediately going back up to finish plays after grabbing a rebound. He can, at times, fall in love with trying to make the spectacular play rather than the easy or fundamental play or simply lose concentration and drop a pass. One area of his game that’s still lacking for Perea is a mid-range game from 7-to-12 feet. The touch on his shot is good from the foul line, but he rarely looks to score outside of the paint. While he might not be counted on to step out much in college, he’ll certainly want to develop a reliable jump shot if he hopes to play in the NBA at 6-foot-8. Ball handling is another aspect of his game that Perea said he’d like to improve at the adidas May Classic.

– Transition and effort: Besides scoring on putbacks, Perea also runs the floor extremely well and is effective finishing on the fastbreak. But perhaps more important is the effort the Colombia native gives and his business-like demeanor on the court. No one can question how hard Perea plays and even as Indiana Elite’s depth problems have taken their toll this spring, Perea hasn’t let fatigue affect his production.

Watch our complete spring video collection of Perea after the jump …

  • Anonymous

    He is an impressive athlete.  He should be a great compliment to Zeller.  They should be able to pick and roll all day with Zeller’s jumpshot and bball acumen and Hanner’s athleticism the defense will have to pick thier poison.

    Hanner has a ton of potential.  A lot will be learned in regards to Crean’s coaching and developmental abilities once Hanner hits IU’s campus.  If Hanner can improve his skill set (jump shot, post moves, fundamentals, etc.) he could be an absolute beast in college.  It appears he has the drive and motivation to get there.  I have confidence the IU staff can move him along.

    Great evaluation Alex.

  • JerryCT

    I have only seen him play once in that all star game in Chicago. Against that level of athlete he got beaten off the dribble more than once so I would add to the list of improvements his ability to play defense with his feet first .

    Keep_It has a good idea on the pick and roll but we donot feature this . To my way of thinking both Patterson and Ferrel are bigger compliments to Zeller or Perea as they can get by their man in the “breakdown zone” without a pick , and then the fun starts. Contrast this with Jones and Hulls requiring a pick in the breakdown zone just to keep their dribble alive.

  • JerryCT

    I have only seen him play once in that all star game in Chicago. Against that level of athlete he got beaten off the dribble more than once so I would add to the list of improvements his ability to play defense with his feet first .

    Keep_It has a good idea on the pick and roll but we donot feature this . To my way of thinking both Patterson and Ferrel are bigger compliments to Zeller or Perea as they can get by their man in the “breakdown zone” without a pick , and then the fun starts. Contrast this with Jones and Hulls requiring a pick in the breakdown zone just to keep their dribble alive.

  • Silverhairedchairthrower

    A Tom Crean coached team does not feature the pick and roll?  Just because we haven’t run it that well doesn’t mean that we don’t feature it.  We, most emphatically, do feature the pick and roll, and Crean’s teams always have.

  • Silverhairedchairthrower

    A Tom Crean coached team does not feature the pick and roll?  Just because we haven’t run it that well doesn’t mean that we don’t feature it.  We, most emphatically, do feature the pick and roll, and Crean’s teams always have.

  • IUJeff

    He is very impressive. Looks pretty good at the free throw line as far as technique. His agressiveness at robounding and having the knack for seemingly always being in the right place at the right time also bodes well for IU. Can’t wait for him to get here and posterize PUke and the Iwhinei about 5 times a game. IU will be crazy good soon.

  • http://www.sportshaze.com The Movement

    Because he’s such a good dunker, I think Hanner takes on the rep of not being a good jump shooter. Most of his highlights are him dunking, but he can take it back to the 17 feet and knock down a jumper too.

  • Kelin Blab

    My expectations of Hanner has been lowered and raised at the same time:

    Lowered because….

    + Offensively right now he relies alot on someone else to set him up and doesn’t do a ton to get his own shot, including posting up on the block. He tends to drift on the offensive end

    Raised expectations…..

    + I can see the end results with Hanner. He has energy, active, and a willing rebounder. He plays with enthusiasm and emotion two important traits for me…a la will and victor.

    + If he adds that mid range game, improve post play on both ends, Hanner has big time upside

    I could see him benefiting from Yogi and other creators like Oden benefited from Conely. When I saw him play earlier this spring, the first thing I thought, when he figures ‘it’ out he is going to be a MONSTER.

  • GalenaScott

    There have been a few games where fatigue has been a factor in Hanner’s May AAU games; but, I admit he tries to play with energy even when he is fatigued. I have seen him play on fumes in upper level Sunday bracket games.  

  • GalenaScott

    There have been a few games where fatigue has been a factor in Hanner’s May AAU games; but, I admit he tries to play with energy even when he is fatigued. I have seen him play on fumes in upper level Sunday bracket games.  

  • JerryCT

    I think it is fair to say we run a “dribble drive” freelance motion w 3 or 4 out and 2 or 1 in. This offense in theory has 4 zones: a) breakdown ( outside the arc) followed by drag, drop and rack. You can you go to web sites that describe this offense ( ie coaches clipboard or Calipari )  and then come back and tell us all where the pick and rolls are.

    Yes IU sets picks in the breakdown zone and yes Elston and TP roll off of it but this is not our featured offense. These screens are not set in order to pass to the roller. They are set because our guards cannot elude their defenders in the breakdown zone w/o it.

    This is a fair debate because it is sometimes the source of the argument as to whether we should run what we can do well or run what the coach wants to teach.

    For the record I favor the pick and roll and have disappointed we do not use it  for offense.

  • JerryCT

    I think it is fair to say we run a “dribble drive” freelance motion w 3 or 4 out and 2 or 1 in. This offense in theory has 4 zones: a) breakdown ( outside the arc) followed by drag, drop and rack. You can you go to web sites that describe this offense ( ie coaches clipboard or Calipari )  and then come back and tell us all where the pick and rolls are.

    Yes IU sets picks in the breakdown zone and yes Elston and TP roll off of it but this is not our featured offense. These screens are not set in order to pass to the roller. They are set because our guards cannot elude their defenders in the breakdown zone w/o it.

    This is a fair debate because it is sometimes the source of the argument as to whether we should run what we can do well or run what the coach wants to teach.

    For the record I favor the pick and roll and have disappointed we do not use it  for offense.

  • JerryCT

    I think it is fair to say we run a “dribble drive” freelance motion w 3 or 4 out and 2 or 1 in. This offense in theory has 4 zones: a) breakdown ( outside the arc) followed by drag, drop and rack. You can you go to web sites that describe this offense ( ie coaches clipboard or Calipari )  and then come back and tell us all where the pick and rolls are.

    Yes IU sets picks in the breakdown zone and yes Elston and TP roll off of it but this is not our featured offense. These screens are not set in order to pass to the roller. They are set because our guards cannot elude their defenders in the breakdown zone w/o it.

    This is a fair debate because it is sometimes the source of the argument as to whether we should run what we can do well or run what the coach wants to teach.

    For the record I favor the pick and roll and have disappointed we do not use it  for offense.

  • Anonymous

    Best thing about Hanner that hasn’t been mentioned in the comments yet: “does a nice job of immediately going back up to finish plays after grabbing a rebound.”

    It’s one thing to be a good rebounder, but when guys are able to immediately go back up with the ball, it’s so much easier to get those second-chance points.  If you can jump back up before everyone else, you’re not going to get blocked.  In one of the highlight videos, he grabbed a rebound in a group of people so you couldn’t quite see what he was doing and I was shocked at how quickly he came back up for the bucket.  

    It’s one thing to jump high, but just as important (and useful) is to jump quickly, and Hanner’s got that skill in spades.

  • Anonymous

    Best thing about Hanner that hasn’t been mentioned in the comments yet: “does a nice job of immediately going back up to finish plays after grabbing a rebound.”

    It’s one thing to be a good rebounder, but when guys are able to immediately go back up with the ball, it’s so much easier to get those second-chance points.  If you can jump back up before everyone else, you’re not going to get blocked.  In one of the highlight videos, he grabbed a rebound in a group of people so you couldn’t quite see what he was doing and I was shocked at how quickly he came back up for the bucket.  

    It’s one thing to jump high, but just as important (and useful) is to jump quickly, and Hanner’s got that skill in spades.

  • Anonymous

    Best thing about Hanner that hasn’t been mentioned in the comments yet: “does a nice job of immediately going back up to finish plays after grabbing a rebound.”

    It’s one thing to be a good rebounder, but when guys are able to immediately go back up with the ball, it’s so much easier to get those second-chance points.  If you can jump back up before everyone else, you’re not going to get blocked.  In one of the highlight videos, he grabbed a rebound in a group of people so you couldn’t quite see what he was doing and I was shocked at how quickly he came back up for the bucket.  

    It’s one thing to jump high, but just as important (and useful) is to jump quickly, and Hanner’s got that skill in spades.

  • marcusgresham

    I’m not totally upset that he doesn’t look like an offensive force.  Yogi’s going to have the ball.  Whomever the 2-guard is will likely be a scorer, as will the 3-man (small forward, not 3-man from the drinking game of the same name.)  If Zeller’s the post, you know you want him getting the ball.  Play d, crash the boards, score when available (and with those other guys on the floor, you’ll be available because there can’t be a lot of doubling off of anyone.)

  • marcusgresham

    I’m not totally upset that he doesn’t look like an offensive force.  Yogi’s going to have the ball.  Whomever the 2-guard is will likely be a scorer, as will the 3-man (small forward, not 3-man from the drinking game of the same name.)  If Zeller’s the post, you know you want him getting the ball.  Play d, crash the boards, score when available (and with those other guys on the floor, you’ll be available because there can’t be a lot of doubling off of anyone.)

  • marcusgresham

    I’m not totally upset that he doesn’t look like an offensive force.  Yogi’s going to have the ball.  Whomever the 2-guard is will likely be a scorer, as will the 3-man (small forward, not 3-man from the drinking game of the same name.)  If Zeller’s the post, you know you want him getting the ball.  Play d, crash the boards, score when available (and with those other guys on the floor, you’ll be available because there can’t be a lot of doubling off of anyone.)

  • CreamandCrimson

    Hanner Perea is going to be a big development test for CTC and his staff.  HP is 6’8″ with long arms, a freakish athlete, plays with effort but is raw offensively and undisciplined defensively.  There is loads of potential and if tapped into, HP could be a force on-campus and make a lot of money at the next level.  His offensive game needs developed and we all know how quickly you can get yourself into foul trouble as an IU big so the defensive game needs work.  That being said, most prospects his age are in the same boat.  Hanner is so intriguing because of his quick and explosive leaping ability and his high-motor.  

    Can CTC and staff coach him and develop his game and take him to the next level?  If so, we will have a legitimate and productive starting frontcourt in 2012 and HP could make it in the NBA.  HP is a key to our return to the top and I look forward to seeing how much he can improve in his time in Bloomington.  I don’t worry about him relying on playmakers to help his offense.  Very few big guys don’t.  He will have Yogi and let’s not forget the passing ability of Zeller. 

  • N71

    Hanner will be a nice fit with all the other guys.  You figure Jeremy and Cody will be called on to score, Yogi run the show, and Harris score if he’s with IU.  Hanner will clean up whenever there’s a missed shot, block shots, rebound…he will be perfect with the other guys who are all rather polished players as this stage of their careers.  Ron will be a utility player at the 1, 2, or 3 depending on who else commits.  If Ron doesn’t foul like BC or DE he will see the most minutes, his defense will become very important (like VO) but then he has no weaknesses on offense as well…considering he’s 6’4″.

  • oldred1976

    I wonder if we’ll be able to convince him to hold still once in a while.

  • http://twitter.com/clsinn Clayton Sinn

    Hanner’s athleticism is incredible.

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