Open Thread: Should the ‘one-and-done’ rule be changed?

  • 06/04/2009 7:14 am in

In case you haven’t noticed, this whole Derrick Rose-SAT story has taken over the Interwebs these past few weeks. It came as no surprise to many because, let’s be honest, the NBA’s ‘one-and-done’ rule has forced kids to attend college with no intention of becoming a serious student.

So on this Thursday morning, we’d like to open the floor for discussion and get your take on a couple of questions:

  • Should the NBA’s rule that a prospect must be one year removed from high school before becoming eligible for the draft be changed?
  • If you think the rule should be changed, what would be your recommendation? And if you’re willing to defend the rule, we’d like to hear your thoughts on that, too.

Filed to:

  • HoosierSmitty

    I used to think they should make kids go to college. I could go on and on about the reasons why it would benefit them. However, you have to look at the reality. They are going to figure out ways to get around the rule, no matter what.

    What does the rule really serve? Is it to ensure this kid gets an education? NOPE Is it to ensure that a university gets a bunch of money by having this kid at that school while the NBA gives a token attempt to look like it gives a damn? DING DING DING – WINNER!

    It's a selfish act on the part of the NCAA and NBA. It's a token a gesture and does nothing for the kids. If it truly benefited the kid, then I'd say keep it or extend, but that's not what happens and we all know it.

    In fact, I believe it hurts a college program more than anything and quite typically its a huge gamble by the NBA to sign one of these players. The NBA should invest its money on programs that require these young adults to seek and receive the proper guidance in terms of financial security, appropriate relationships, and adulthood.

  • HoosierSmitty

    Stern is a joke just like his league.

  • HoosierSmitty

    Stern is a joke just like his league.

  • Bryan

    The one-and-done rule isn't going anywhere. The NCAA has no control over it, and it makes too much sense financially to the NBA to abolish it. Their teams get to draft players that are more established names, and they get an additional opportunity to evaluate talent. The players they do draft are older, closer to being physically mature, and for the most part are able to benefit from good coaching in the college ranks.

    Everything I've read has indicated that the NBA is going to pursue changing the one-and-done rule to a two-and-done rule when their current contract with the players expires. Given that this is collectively bargained with players who don't like to lose their job to rookies, it is likely that it will pass without much difficulty.

    I would like to see the NBA open up their developmental league to phenoms, they likely cannot, because that would probably be the basis for challenging the legality of the one-and-done rule, so it will never happen. Given that, I have no problem with a talented player going overseas. It will certainly open their eyes to participate in a work environment where they aren't constantly coddled.

    Now, as for the sanctity of the college game, the NCAA can do things, but as usual, that organization will pawn responsibility off on everyone else and try to claim that they are on top of things.

    That said, I would like to see them:
    1. Make a scholarship have a minimum commitment of 2 – 3 years by the player. In exchange, the NCAA should make scholarships a true four year commitment. None of this John Calipari-running-off-half-a-team-to-sign-new-players bullshit. If you sign a player to a scholarship, it is their scholarship for their education.
    2. Tighten up the academic clearinghouse process. The stupidest part of the recent headlines involving Derrick Rose is that the NCAA initially cleared him to play. I realize the logistics of this are daunting, given that the NCAA is more than football and basketball, but there's got to be a way to administer ACT/SAT to a kid in a way that someone else can't just take in your place.

  • Bryan

    The one-and-done rule isn't going anywhere. The NCAA has no control over it, and it makes too much sense financially to the NBA to abolish it. Their teams get to draft players that are more established names, and they get an additional opportunity to evaluate talent. The players they do draft are older, closer to being physically mature, and for the most part are able to benefit from good coaching in the college ranks.

    Everything I've read has indicated that the NBA is going to pursue changing the one-and-done rule to a two-and-done rule when their current contract with the players expires. Given that this is collectively bargained with players who don't like to lose their job to rookies, it is likely that it will pass without much difficulty.

    I would like to see the NBA open up their developmental league to phenoms, they likely cannot, because that would probably be the basis for challenging the legality of the one-and-done rule, so it will never happen. Given that, I have no problem with a talented player going overseas. It will certainly open their eyes to participate in a work environment where they aren't constantly coddled.

    Now, as for the sanctity of the college game, the NCAA can do things, but as usual, that organization will pawn responsibility off on everyone else and try to claim that they are on top of things.

    That said, I would like to see them:
    1. Make a scholarship have a minimum commitment of 2 – 3 years by the player. In exchange, the NCAA should make scholarships a true four year commitment. None of this John Calipari-running-off-half-a-team-to-sign-new-players bullshit. If you sign a player to a scholarship, it is their scholarship for their education.
    2. Tighten up the academic clearinghouse process. The stupidest part of the recent headlines involving Derrick Rose is that the NCAA initially cleared him to play. I realize the logistics of this are daunting, given that the NCAA is more than football and basketball, but there's got to be a way to administer ACT/SAT to a kid in a way that someone else can't just take in your place.

  • Julian

    I agree about the type of low cue players and i also think it should be 2 years because college teaches more than just bball skills. I hope they just dont just eliminate the rule all together. But players are getting better and some dont really need college

  • Julian

    I agree about the type of low cue players and i also think it should be 2 years because college teaches more than just bball skills. I hope they just dont just eliminate the rule all together. But players are getting better and some dont really need college

  • Julian

    bringing up Born Ready were is he going? I know he hasn't committed but the doesn't seem to be much news about him actually picking a school

  • Julian

    bringing up Born Ready were is he going? I know he hasn't committed but the doesn't seem to be much news about him actually picking a school

  • Julian

    Wow that is an interesting point that i do some what agree with, and i have to admit, it is pretty funny…but i am concerned about those kids like Louis Williams (76ers) who get drafted in the second round and don't make and impact on the team till 3 years down the road. Wouldn't it be great to have him in college then go to the NBA after his junior year.

  • Julian

    Wow that is an interesting point that i do some what agree with, and i have to admit, it is pretty funny…but i am concerned about those kids like Louis Williams (76ers) who get drafted in the second round and don't make and impact on the team till 3 years down the road. Wouldn't it be great to have him in college then go to the NBA after his junior year.

  • Julian

    good point

  • Julian

    I like that kids have to go to college, but i dont think you really can force a kid to go to a school when his heart is set for next year for the draft. And dose anyone think that Eric Gordon improved his stock in the draft just by going to school, well maybe that is just me

  • Julian

    I like that kids have to go to college, but i dont think you really can force a kid to go to a school when his heart is set for next year for the draft. And dose anyone think that Eric Gordon improved his stock in the draft just by going to school, well maybe that is just me

  • Kelin Blab

    Julian…Just read an extensive article on Born Ready…..the problem is….there is some question about his amatuer status as bornready.tv may have been a money maker for the film makers which gave mony to stephenson. The other issue is, taking him and his dad, as his dad has been a problem. ANother issue is he has made it clear it is ONE and DONE ironically and some coaches don't know if it is worth all the headaches for one year.

    Right now I have heard Fla. International is interested and some other school…all the big boys have been scared off.

    If KS were here he would be on his way to Bloomington right now..scary

  • Kelin Blab

    Julian…Just read an extensive article on Born Ready…..the problem is….there is some question about his amatuer status as bornready.tv may have been a money maker for the film makers which gave mony to stephenson. The other issue is, taking him and his dad, as his dad has been a problem. ANother issue is he has made it clear it is ONE and DONE ironically and some coaches don't know if it is worth all the headaches for one year.

    Right now I have heard Fla. International is interested and some other school…all the big boys have been scared off.

    If KS were here he would be on his way to Bloomington right now..scary

  • ed

    No i do not think it should be changed.The players that are ready for the nba
    is a very low number most are not ready out of high school many are drafted and sit for 4 years before playing as well . I believe it is also good for college
    basketball. Dont think we should be so quick on this subject.

  • kreigh_smiths_short_shorts

    Well, who would it be great for? The kid or the organization? Would he be better served by working with his management team and learning professional computer systems, making big money but maybe not making presentations to potential clients and developing “real” stuff OR would he be better served by learning less sophisticated programming and software, for free, with the potential of breaking a finger on a keyboard and never being able to work for Microsoft down the line because he can't type?

    I mean, I think everybody should further their education to the extent that they can. But college isn't for everyone.

  • kreigh_smiths_short_shorts

    Well, who would it be great for? The kid or the organization? Would he be better served by working with his management team and learning professional computer systems, making big money but maybe not making presentations to potential clients and developing “real” stuff OR would he be better served by learning less sophisticated programming and software, for free, with the potential of breaking a finger on a keyboard and never being able to work for Microsoft down the line because he can't type?

    I mean, I think everybody should further their education to the extent that they can. But college isn't for everyone.

  • rvrex

    My only issue with this is “how can you make someone stay for 2-3 years” unless their choice of college keeps them locked out of the NBA. That would open up a lot of lawsuits.

    I would like to see minimum 2 years between highschool and the NBA which could either be filled by going to college or the developmental league. 2 years in college forces them to study for at least 1 1/2 years and those that do not want that route could do the developmental thing.

    They could also add the option of being able to pull a player from the developmental league for short time exposure to the NBA with some restrictions on how long and how many times in the 2 year period.

    This can all be worked out, but whatever is done it will not be perfect. The one year deal seemed pretty good at the start but after going into use the problems became obvious. In the same way any new program will have problems. It needs to be an evolving program.

  • rvrex

    My only issue with this is “how can you make someone stay for 2-3 years” unless their choice of college keeps them locked out of the NBA. That would open up a lot of lawsuits.

    I would like to see minimum 2 years between highschool and the NBA which could either be filled by going to college or the developmental league. 2 years in college forces them to study for at least 1 1/2 years and those that do not want that route could do the developmental thing.

    They could also add the option of being able to pull a player from the developmental league for short time exposure to the NBA with some restrictions on how long and how many times in the 2 year period.

    This can all be worked out, but whatever is done it will not be perfect. The one year deal seemed pretty good at the start but after going into use the problems became obvious. In the same way any new program will have problems. It needs to be an evolving program.

  • BGleas

    I probably used a poor choice of words there. My point is that if they don't declare for the draft out of high school, then they can't declare for 2-3 years. What they'd do with those 2-3 year is up to them, college, NBDL and Europe would all be in play.

    One thing a lot of people miss is that the NBDL option is currently in play. Eric Gordon could have skipped college altogether and played in the NBDL for a year before declaring for the draft. The issue is that the pay and exposure are so low in the NBDL.

  • BGleas

    I probably used a poor choice of words there. My point is that if they don't declare for the draft out of high school, then they can't declare for 2-3 years. What they'd do with those 2-3 year is up to them, college, NBDL and Europe would all be in play.

    One thing a lot of people miss is that the NBDL option is currently in play. Eric Gordon could have skipped college altogether and played in the NBDL for a year before declaring for the draft. The issue is that the pay and exposure are so low in the NBDL.

  • CraiginOR

    As Alex said ” the D.Rose SAT/story has taken over…”. Now this from ESPN…”ATHENS, Ga. — Former University of Memphis forward Robert Dozier's initial SAT score was invalidated by the company that scores the exam, and when he took the test a second time, he scored 540 fewer points, ESPN.com has learned through an open records request”.
    QUESTION if IU had hired Calipari would we fans be supporting him like KY or would we be calling for his head?

  • CraiginOR

    As Alex said ” the D.Rose SAT/story has taken over…”. Now this from ESPN…”ATHENS, Ga. — Former University of Memphis forward Robert Dozier's initial SAT score was invalidated by the company that scores the exam, and when he took the test a second time, he scored 540 fewer points, ESPN.com has learned through an open records request”.
    QUESTION if IU had hired Calipari would we fans be supporting him like KY or would we be calling for his head?

  • CraiginOR

    BGleas, As Alex said ” the D.Rose SAT/story has taken over…”. Now this from ESPN…”ATHENS, Ga. — Former University of Memphis forward Robert Dozier's initial SAT score was invalidated by the company that scores the exam, and when he took the test a second time, he scored 540 fewer points, ESPN.com has learned through an open records request”.
    QUESTION if IU had hired Calipari would we fans be supporting him like KY or would we be calling for his head?

  • CraiginOR

    BGleas, As Alex said ” the D.Rose SAT/story has taken over…”. It seems the media finds more about Calipari every day. Now this from ESPN…”ATHENS, Ga. — Former University of Memphis forward Robert Dozier's initial SAT score was invalidated by the company that scores the exam, and when he took the test a second time, he scored 540 fewer points, ESPN.com has learned through an open records request”.
    QUESTION if IU had hired Calipari would we fans be supporting him like KY or would we be calling for his head?

  • BGleas

    Hey Craig,

    I think if IU had hired Calipari and these things happened the fanbase would immediately turn on him. We questioned and turned on Sampson (rightfully so) pretty quickly.

    Not sure if you were just asking me hypothetically, or if you think I would support Calipari, but he's not someone I ever wanted or would want want IU to hire.

    Just clearing that up in case there was a misconception.

  • BGleas

    Hey Craig,

    I think if IU had hired Calipari and these things happened the fanbase would immediately turn on him. We questioned and turned on Sampson (rightfully so) pretty quickly.

    Not sure if you were just asking me hypothetically, or if you think I would support Calipari, but he's not someone I ever wanted or would want want IU to hire.

    Just clearing that up in case there was a misconception.

  • CraiginOR

    I agree, I think our fanbase would be screaming “OFF with his head” if
    Calipari were at IU. Wonder why Kentucky has no integrity?

  • CraiginOR

    I agree, I think our fanbase would be screaming “OFF with his head” if
    Calipari were at IU. Wonder why Kentucky has no integrity?

  • Mike Davis

    Just as long as they don't make any impermissible phone calls, cheat away.

  • Mike Davis

    Just as long as they don't make any impermissible phone calls, cheat away.

  • bob

    Sure, everyone points to Kwame Brown, but Michael Olowakandi spent four years in college. The known quantity argument is crap. If you go through the history since Garnett, a much higher percentage of college players have been busts than high school players. It's a marketing ploy, and it's also supported by NBA vets not wanting to lose their roster spots.

    Louis Williams developed because he rode the bench for the 76ers for three years, not despite it. College ball is a joke competition-wise compared to both the NBA and Europe, to act like it gives a developmental advantage is insanity.

    Mentally, it's the same. Large state universities, while great research institutions and still home to many a genius undergrad, have also become a breeding ground for neanderthals. College isn't what it used to be, and there's no reason to think an immature high schooler won't gravitate towards the immature segment of the student body. Someone like Brandon Jennings, who has experienced living in a foreign country, learned what it's like to have limited minutes (to which no college program would subject its prized recruit), and also learned how to manage money and a job is light years ahead of the average college player.

  • bob

    Sure, everyone points to Kwame Brown, but Michael Olowakandi spent four years in college. The known quantity argument is crap. If you go through the history since Garnett, a much higher percentage of college players have been busts than high school players. It's a marketing ploy, and it's also supported by NBA vets not wanting to lose their roster spots.

    Louis Williams developed because he rode the bench for the 76ers for three years, not despite it. College ball is a joke competition-wise compared to both the NBA and Europe, to act like it gives a developmental advantage is insanity.

    Mentally, it's the same. Large state universities, while great research institutions and still home to many a genius undergrad, have also become a breeding ground for neanderthals. College isn't what it used to be, and there's no reason to think an immature high schooler won't gravitate towards the immature segment of the student body. Someone like Brandon Jennings, who has experienced living in a foreign country, learned what it's like to have limited minutes (to which no college program would subject its prized recruit), and also learned how to manage money and a job is light years ahead of the average college player.

  • bob

    Yes, I'm sure this is all about preventing underage drinking.

  • bob

    Yes, I'm sure this is all about preventing underage drinking.

  • the one and done rule was established in order to allow players to mature before attempting to enter the NBA. that being said, what if players wanting to come out of high school had to have a certain gpa ( maybe a minimum in the 3.0-3.5 range) or even SAT/ACT score in order to be eligible for the draft? that would ensure that true student atheletes are being drafted and would allow the NBA to have a positive impact on its young fans.

  • the one and done rule was established in order to allow players to mature before attempting to enter the NBA. that being said, what if players wanting to come out of high school had to have a certain gpa ( maybe a minimum in the 3.0-3.5 range) or even SAT/ACT score in order to be eligible for the draft? that would ensure that true student atheletes are being drafted and would allow the NBA to have a positive impact on its young fans.