Balcony seats $5 for IU’s seven remaining home games

  • 01/19/2009 1:36 pm in

In an effort to boost sagging attendance, Indiana Athletic Director Fred Glass announced that balcony seats will be just $5 for the remainder of the home schedule:

Indiana University Vice President and Director of Athletics Fred Glass is hoping to attract more fans to come to Assembly Hall for the remainder of the 2009 men’s basketball season. Effective immediately, balcony tickets (subject to availability) will be on sale for the remainder of the season for $5 per game.

“Attendance at Assembly Hall, as it has been around the conference is a little down,” said Glass. “Because some of this is likely attributable to the challenging national economic situation, we want to make the games more affordable and otherwise more family friendly.”

“I love how hard our team plays and how hard Coach Crean coaches,” added Glass. “They never quit and I want to encourage Hoosier Nation not to quit on them. Fan support in Assembly Hall has been tremendous. We just want to encourage more people to be there.”

Among ideas that Glass hopes will catch on with the Hoosier faithful is an honorary game captain; allowing youngsters to shoot layups on Assembly hall’s hallowed hardwood following weekend home games; encouraging the crowd to be more engaged in and around the game; and resurrecting spirit signs for dorms, greek houses, and local businesses to hang up prior to home games.

While I admire Glass’s attempt to place warm bodies inside the droves of empty seats at Assembly Hall, I must whole heartedly disagree with his comment about the economy. Over the weekend, I attended the Louisville-Pittsburgh game and there was not an empty seat to be found and the concession lines were longer than ever. The same can be said at nearly ever other big-time program across the country. The fact is that the casual fan is not coming to IU games this season because the product is not what they have grown to expect.

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  • Kelin Blab

    A-

    I agree 100%, the economy sucked last year and the place was full. In the great words of the philospher Denny Green…”They are who we thought they were…….” Nevertheless…I will take full advantage of some $5 tickets.

  • Kelin Blab

    A-

    I agree 100%, the economy sucked last year and the place was full. In the great words of the philospher Denny Green…”They are who we thought they were…….” Nevertheless…I will take full advantage of some $5 tickets.

  • Kelin Blab

    A-

    I agree 100%, the economy sucked last year and the place was full. In the great words of the philospher Denny Green…”They are who we thought they were…….” Nevertheless…I will take full advantage of some $5 tickets.

  • cooper

    Economy has nothing to do with it, paying to see team blown out from bad seats has everything to do with it

  • cooper

    Economy has nothing to do with it, paying to see team blown out from bad seats has everything to do with it

  • cooper

    Economy has nothing to do with it, paying to see team blown out from bad seats has everything to do with it

  • Steve

    I agree that it is more to do with the team's poor play and less with the economy, but what do you want Glass to say in this situation? “Well our team sucks, so we're lowering ticket prices.” You can't have the brand new AD throwing the brand new coach trying to rebuild the program under the bus.

    The economy is a PR-friendly cop-out, but its his only play here.

  • Steve

    I agree that it is more to do with the team's poor play and less with the economy, but what do you want Glass to say in this situation? “Well our team sucks, so we're lowering ticket prices.” You can't have the brand new AD throwing the brand new coach trying to rebuild the program under the bus.

    The economy is a PR-friendly cop-out, but its his only play here.

  • Steve

    I agree that it is more to do with the team's poor play and less with the economy, but what do you want Glass to say in this situation? “Well our team sucks, so we're lowering ticket prices.” You can't have the brand new AD throwing the brand new coach trying to rebuild the program under the bus.

    The economy is a PR-friendly cop-out, but its his only play here.

  • CutterInChicago

    As posted on another messageboard back in November
    I got a letter inviting me to buy season tickets for this season. I recently joined the Varsity Club and bought IU football tickets so I figured “sure, I'd buy tickets.” So I called the ticket office and was told that: 1) the tickets are in the balcony – not a big deal, I was still willing to buy them – but 2) buying season tickets this year would not guarantee me ANY tickets, even balcony tickets, for next year and that it also would not get me on the wait list for main level season tickets. I mean, that's just dumb (and now they are trying to almost give the tickets away). If I'm going to buy balcony tickets for this year, I get no (or little) credit for next year? Why wouldn't I sit at home and watch everything on Direct TV in high definition?
    So, if you are trying to keep some revenue coming in and build goodwill and reward loyalty, it seems that this was exactly the opposite way to do all that.

  • CutterInChicago

    As posted on another messageboard back in November
    I got a letter inviting me to buy season tickets for this season. I recently joined the Varsity Club and bought IU football tickets so I figured “sure, I'd buy tickets.” So I called the ticket office and was told that: 1) the tickets are in the balcony – not a big deal, I was still willing to buy them – but 2) buying season tickets this year would not guarantee me ANY tickets, even balcony tickets, for next year and that it also would not get me on the wait list for main level season tickets. I mean, that's just dumb (and now they are trying to almost give the tickets away). If I'm going to buy balcony tickets for this year, I get no (or little) credit for next year? Why wouldn't I sit at home and watch everything on Direct TV in high definition?
    So, if you are trying to keep some revenue coming in and build goodwill and reward loyalty, it seems that this was exactly the opposite way to do all that.

  • CutterInChicago

    As posted on another messageboard back in November
    I got a letter inviting me to buy season tickets for this season. I recently joined the Varsity Club and bought IU football tickets so I figured “sure, I'd buy tickets.” So I called the ticket office and was told that: 1) the tickets are in the balcony – not a big deal, I was still willing to buy them – but 2) buying season tickets this year would not guarantee me ANY tickets, even balcony tickets, for next year and that it also would not get me on the wait list for main level season tickets. I mean, that's just dumb (and now they are trying to almost give the tickets away). If I'm going to buy balcony tickets for this year, I get no (or little) credit for next year? Why wouldn't I sit at home and watch everything on Direct TV in high definition?
    So, if you are trying to keep some revenue coming in and build goodwill and reward loyalty, it seems that this was exactly the opposite way to do all that.

  • nealE

    the reason you don't get credit is the tickets they are asking you to buy are student tickets, and they still are unsure of how they will handle these tickets in the future. they can't offer you any tickets in the future if they end up going back to the students, because they simply won't be available.

  • the reason you don't get credit is the tickets they are asking you to buy are student tickets, and they still are unsure of how they will handle these tickets in the future. they can't offer you any tickets in the future if they end up going back to the students, because they simply won't be available.

  • the reason you don't get credit is the tickets they are asking you to buy are student tickets, and they still are unsure of how they will handle these tickets in the future. they can't offer you any tickets in the future if they end up going back to the students, because they simply won't be available.

  • nealE

    i would agree that some programs across the country are still selling out, but there are some that are not. purdue is not sold out for all games, and they are expected to be at the top of the conference. uconn did not sell out before the season started, and i am unsure if they have sold out every game at this point either. and to be fair – the louisville-pittsburg game might not be the greatest example due to pitt being ranked so high. i think that the economy definitly has something to do with ticket sales. so does the teams talent level and play to this point. but i would say that had this team played in last years economy, there would be more seats sold. maybe it wouldn't be sold out, but it would be better than the situation we are in now.

    i love the $5 deal. the crowd looked better than it has all year from what i'm told (i missed my first game in 4 years due to work… not too happy about that).

  • i would agree that some programs across the country are still selling out, but there are some that are not. purdue is not sold out for all games, and they are expected to be at the top of the conference. uconn did not sell out before the season started, and i am unsure if they have sold out every game at this point either. and to be fair – the louisville-pittsburg game might not be the greatest example due to pitt being ranked so high. i think that the economy definitly has something to do with ticket sales. so does the teams talent level and play to this point. but i would say that had this team played in last years economy, there would be more seats sold. maybe it wouldn't be sold out, but it would be better than the situation we are in now.

    i love the $5 deal. the crowd looked better than it has all year from what i'm told (i missed my first game in 4 years due to work… not too happy about that).

  • i would agree that some programs across the country are still selling out, but there are some that are not. purdue is not sold out for all games, and they are expected to be at the top of the conference. uconn did not sell out before the season started, and i am unsure if they have sold out every game at this point either. and to be fair – the louisville-pittsburg game might not be the greatest example due to pitt being ranked so high. i think that the economy definitly has something to do with ticket sales. so does the teams talent level and play to this point. but i would say that had this team played in last years economy, there would be more seats sold. maybe it wouldn't be sold out, but it would be better than the situation we are in now.

    i love the $5 deal. the crowd looked better than it has all year from what i'm told (i missed my first game in 4 years due to work… not too happy about that).

  • Hoosier_Hound

    Congrats to the Lady Hoosiers on their win over Purdue. Awesome!

  • Hoosier_Hound

    Congrats to the Lady Hoosiers on their win over Purdue. Awesome!

  • Hoosier_Hound

    Congrats to the Lady Hoosiers on their win over Purdue. Awesome!

  • chawalte

    Lowering the prices of balcony tickets is the wrong answer, from a loyalty perspective or a fiscal perspective. Think of the students who bought season tickets for $12 per game (?) and were stuck with some balcony seats for some clunker games. Now these students are learning that they could have simply bought tickets from scalpers and/or waited until now to get cheaper tickets? That would certainly leave a bad taste in my mouth with respect to the IU Athletics Department.

    And from a financial perspective, while it seems logical that lowering prices will drive up revenue because more tickets will be purchased, there are multiple unintended effects as well.

    First, it lowers the perceived value of the season tickets purchased by alumni and students in the balcony and on the floor for the reasons stated above and because “Gee, I could have sat up there and saved $50 per ticket!”

    Second, because of the lower perceived value from this season it will set the bar lower for next season's ticket prices. Consumers will remember the lower ticket prices from this year and/or the value of waiting until there's a “fire sale”, so revenue will be lower next season as well.

    Third, a rule I heard in Pricing class goes something like this: on average, cutting a product's price by 1% will reduce the seller's profit by 8%. Granted the athletic department has to decide between keeping the prices at $12 and receiving $0 or dropping the price to $5 and getting it. Every time I think of a price cut I think of specifically this rule. Maybe it doesn't work in this case, but still.

    Above all else… this all goes back to KS, and the IU administration that approved of his hiring and firing. It clearly has left a financial skidmark that is much longer than we anticipated. You reap what you sow, Indiana.

    In my opinion, the school should have simply stated this season is a blip that won't happen again if they do the right things, and they should write it off as a loss. Cutting prices to get butts in seats will do more damage than good.

    ONE GOOD THING that comes from this horrendous men's basketball season is that HOPEFULLY it shines more light on the fabulous Indiana women's basketball team!! I wish that more IU students would bundle up and make the trek to Assembly Hall to watch the ladies. They have talent that has been simmering for years and now they have taken over first place in the Big Ten with tonight's slapping of Purdue. Heck, I am in South Carolina and I made it a point to watch the game on TV. Support your teams through thick and thin, and whether they are shiny or not. Go see your Indiana women's basketball team! They'll be making a trip to the NCAA Tournament after a couple trips to the WNIT recently.

    One more note: thank GOD someone told Sharon Versyp (former Indiana women's coach, now Purdue women's coach) to get a new hairstyle. Did anyone ever notice that she had the same hairstyle two years ago as she did 25 years ago? Ouch.

  • chawalte

    Lowering the prices of balcony tickets is the wrong answer, from a loyalty perspective or a fiscal perspective. Think of the students who bought season tickets for $12 per game (?) and were stuck with some balcony seats for some clunker games. Now these students are learning that they could have simply bought tickets from scalpers and/or waited until now to get cheaper tickets? That would certainly leave a bad taste in my mouth with respect to the IU Athletics Department.

    And from a financial perspective, while it seems logical that lowering prices will drive up revenue because more tickets will be purchased, there are multiple unintended effects as well.

    First, it lowers the perceived value of the season tickets purchased by alumni and students in the balcony and on the floor for the reasons stated above and because “Gee, I could have sat up there and saved $50 per ticket!”

    Second, because of the lower perceived value from this season it will set the bar lower for next season's ticket prices. Consumers will remember the lower ticket prices from this year and/or the value of waiting until there's a “fire sale”, so revenue will be lower next season as well.

    Third, a rule I heard in Pricing class goes something like this: on average, cutting a product's price by 1% will reduce the seller's profit by 8%. Granted the athletic department has to decide between keeping the prices at $12 and receiving $0 or dropping the price to $5 and getting it. Every time I think of a price cut I think of specifically this rule. Maybe it doesn't work in this case, but still.

    Above all else… this all goes back to KS, and the IU administration that approved of his hiring and firing. It clearly has left a financial skidmark that is much longer than we anticipated. You reap what you sow, Indiana.

    In my opinion, the school should have simply stated this season is a blip that won't happen again if they do the right things, and they should write it off as a loss. Cutting prices to get butts in seats will do more damage than good.

    ONE GOOD THING that comes from this horrendous men's basketball season is that HOPEFULLY it shines more light on the fabulous Indiana women's basketball team!! I wish that more IU students would bundle up and make the trek to Assembly Hall to watch the ladies. They have talent that has been simmering for years and now they have taken over first place in the Big Ten with tonight's slapping of Purdue. Heck, I am in South Carolina and I made it a point to watch the game on TV. Support your teams through thick and thin, and whether they are shiny or not. Go see your Indiana women's basketball team! They'll be making a trip to the NCAA Tournament after a couple trips to the WNIT recently.

    One more note: thank GOD someone told Sharon Versyp (former Indiana women's coach, now Purdue women's coach) to get a new hairstyle. Did anyone ever notice that she had the same hairstyle two years ago as she did 25 years ago? Ouch.

  • chawalte

    Lowering the prices of balcony tickets is the wrong answer, from a loyalty perspective or a fiscal perspective. Think of the students who bought season tickets for $12 per game (?) and were stuck with some balcony seats for some clunker games. Now these students are learning that they could have simply bought tickets from scalpers and/or waited until now to get cheaper tickets? That would certainly leave a bad taste in my mouth with respect to the IU Athletics Department.

    And from a financial perspective, while it seems logical that lowering prices will drive up revenue because more tickets will be purchased, there are multiple unintended effects as well.

    First, it lowers the perceived value of the season tickets purchased by alumni and students in the balcony and on the floor for the reasons stated above and because “Gee, I could have sat up there and saved $50 per ticket!”

    Second, because of the lower perceived value from this season it will set the bar lower for next season's ticket prices. Consumers will remember the lower ticket prices from this year and/or the value of waiting until there's a “fire sale”, so revenue will be lower next season as well.

    Third, a rule I heard in Pricing class goes something like this: on average, cutting a product's price by 1% will reduce the seller's profit by 8%. Granted the athletic department has to decide between keeping the prices at $12 and receiving $0 or dropping the price to $5 and getting it. Every time I think of a price cut I think of specifically this rule. Maybe it doesn't work in this case, but still.

    Above all else… this all goes back to KS, and the IU administration that approved of his hiring and firing. It clearly has left a financial skidmark that is much longer than we anticipated. You reap what you sow, Indiana.

    In my opinion, the school should have simply stated this season is a blip that won't happen again if they do the right things, and they should write it off as a loss. Cutting prices to get butts in seats will do more damage than good.

    ONE GOOD THING that comes from this horrendous men's basketball season is that HOPEFULLY it shines more light on the fabulous Indiana women's basketball team!! I wish that more IU students would bundle up and make the trek to Assembly Hall to watch the ladies. They have talent that has been simmering for years and now they have taken over first place in the Big Ten with tonight's slapping of Purdue. Heck, I am in South Carolina and I made it a point to watch the game on TV. Support your teams through thick and thin, and whether they are shiny or not. Go see your Indiana women's basketball team! They'll be making a trip to the NCAA Tournament after a couple trips to the WNIT recently.

    One more note: thank GOD someone told Sharon Versyp (former Indiana women's coach, now Purdue women's coach) to get a new hairstyle. Did anyone ever notice that she had the same hairstyle two years ago as she did 25 years ago? Ouch.

  • Anonymous

    Lowering the prices of balcony tickets is the wrong answer, from a loyalty perspective or a fiscal perspective. Think of the students who bought season tickets for $12 per game (?) and were stuck with some balcony seats for some clunker games. Now these students are learning that they could have simply bought tickets from scalpers and/or waited until now to get cheaper tickets? That would certainly leave a bad taste in my mouth with respect to the IU Athletics Department.

    And from a financial perspective, while it seems logical that lowering prices will drive up revenue because more tickets will be purchased, there are multiple unintended effects as well.

    First, it lowers the perceived value of the season tickets purchased by alumni and students in the balcony and on the floor for the reasons stated above and because “Gee, I could have sat up there and saved $50 per ticket!”

    Second, because of the lower perceived value from this season it will set the bar lower for next season’s ticket prices. Consumers will remember the lower ticket prices from this year and/or the value of waiting until there’s a “fire sale”, so revenue will be lower next season as well.

    Third, a rule I heard in Pricing class goes something like this: on average, cutting a product’s price by 1% will reduce the seller’s profit by 8%. Granted the athletic department has to decide between keeping the prices at $12 and receiving $0 or dropping the price to $5 and getting it. Every time I think of a price cut I think of specifically this rule. Maybe it doesn’t work in this case, but still.

    Above all else… this all goes back to KS, and the IU administration that approved of his hiring and firing. It clearly has left a financial skidmark that is much longer than we anticipated. You reap what you sow, Indiana.

    In my opinion, the school should have simply stated this season is a blip that won’t happen again if they do the right things, and they should write it off as a loss. Cutting prices to get butts in seats will do more damage than good.

    ONE GOOD THING that comes from this horrendous men’s basketball season is that HOPEFULLY it shines more light on the fabulous Indiana women’s basketball team!! I wish that more IU students would bundle up and make the trek to Assembly Hall to watch the ladies. They have talent that has been simmering for years and now they have taken over first place in the Big Ten with tonight’s slapping of Purdue. Heck, I am in South Carolina and I made it a point to watch the game on TV. Support your teams through thick and thin, and whether they are shiny or not. Go see your Indiana women’s basketball team! They’ll be making a trip to the NCAA Tournament after a couple trips to the WNIT recently.

    One more note: thank GOD someone told Sharon Versyp (former Indiana women’s coach, now Purdue women’s coach) to get a new hairstyle. Did anyone ever notice that she had the same hairstyle two years ago as she did 25 years ago? Ouch.

  • BFowler

    Remember the rule of capacity when pricing. If you are flying a plane, for example, you still have to fly the entire plane, regardless of how many seats are filled (as long as it is above 0) to maintain service level (the airline's product), so any amount would contribute to the cost of flying that plane and the only variable cost you have is the amount of fuel it would take to fly the plane with the lower weight (which would not vary THAT much). The same goes for Assembly Hall. The workers there (same as pilots, flight attendants, etc.) still get paid the same rate regardless of how many seats are filled, but the more that are filled at any price is a contribution to your fixed costs (as variable costs would remain exactly the same regardless of how many people are there).

    Now, the marketing of the deal is another ball game (to coin a phrase). The seller has to take the customer into account in this situation and the psychology of selling the same product at a different price. It would be the same as you waiting for your favorite product to go on sale or using a coupon when someone else paid full price. The seller has to move the product regardless, and the expiration date on seats in an arena is the day and time of that game or event, so all seats must be filled to maximize profit or minimize loss.

    As a lifelong Hoosier fan, I always dreamed of someday holding season tickets, but alas, my position in life does not afford me to purchase at any cost because it would be a waste of my money due to my inability to attend. However, I still make sure the DVR is set to watch every second of every game, it is the only thing I really never want to miss and I get upset if I do miss it. On another note, it was so gratifying to see Coach Jack's troops beat those Lady Boilers, that was really the only thing (OK, football) that the school up North could hold over Hoosiers' heads.

  • BFowler

    Remember the rule of capacity when pricing. If you are flying a plane, for example, you still have to fly the entire plane, regardless of how many seats are filled (as long as it is above 0) to maintain service level (the airline's product), so any amount would contribute to the cost of flying that plane and the only variable cost you have is the amount of fuel it would take to fly the plane with the lower weight (which would not vary THAT much). The same goes for Assembly Hall. The workers there (same as pilots, flight attendants, etc.) still get paid the same rate regardless of how many seats are filled, but the more that are filled at any price is a contribution to your fixed costs (as variable costs would remain exactly the same regardless of how many people are there).

    Now, the marketing of the deal is another ball game (to coin a phrase). The seller has to take the customer into account in this situation and the psychology of selling the same product at a different price. It would be the same as you waiting for your favorite product to go on sale or using a coupon when someone else paid full price. The seller has to move the product regardless, and the expiration date on seats in an arena is the day and time of that game or event, so all seats must be filled to maximize profit or minimize loss.

    As a lifelong Hoosier fan, I always dreamed of someday holding season tickets, but alas, my position in life does not afford me to purchase at any cost because it would be a waste of my money due to my inability to attend. However, I still make sure the DVR is set to watch every second of every game, it is the only thing I really never want to miss and I get upset if I do miss it. On another note, it was so gratifying to see Coach Jack's troops beat those Lady Boilers, that was really the only thing (OK, football) that the school up North could hold over Hoosiers' heads.

  • BFowler

    Remember the rule of capacity when pricing. If you are flying a plane, for example, you still have to fly the entire plane, regardless of how many seats are filled (as long as it is above 0) to maintain service level (the airline's product), so any amount would contribute to the cost of flying that plane and the only variable cost you have is the amount of fuel it would take to fly the plane with the lower weight (which would not vary THAT much). The same goes for Assembly Hall. The workers there (same as pilots, flight attendants, etc.) still get paid the same rate regardless of how many seats are filled, but the more that are filled at any price is a contribution to your fixed costs (as variable costs would remain exactly the same regardless of how many people are there).

    Now, the marketing of the deal is another ball game (to coin a phrase). The seller has to take the customer into account in this situation and the psychology of selling the same product at a different price. It would be the same as you waiting for your favorite product to go on sale or using a coupon when someone else paid full price. The seller has to move the product regardless, and the expiration date on seats in an arena is the day and time of that game or event, so all seats must be filled to maximize profit or minimize loss.

    As a lifelong Hoosier fan, I always dreamed of someday holding season tickets, but alas, my position in life does not afford me to purchase at any cost because it would be a waste of my money due to my inability to attend. However, I still make sure the DVR is set to watch every second of every game, it is the only thing I really never want to miss and I get upset if I do miss it. On another note, it was so gratifying to see Coach Jack's troops beat those Lady Boilers, that was really the only thing (OK, football) that the school up North could hold over Hoosiers' heads.

  • tberry

    If you win, fans will come. If you lose, fans will not come. Fans are fickle and really are only fans when they can be associated with winning and glory. When there is no winning and no glory, they would rather stay home and play with themselves.

  • tberry

    If you win, fans will come. If you lose, fans will not come. Fans are fickle and really are only fans when they can be associated with winning and glory. When there is no winning and no glory, they would rather stay home and play with themselves.

  • tberry

    If you win, fans will come. If you lose, fans will not come. Fans are fickle and really are only fans when they can be associated with winning and glory. When there is no winning and no glory, they would rather stay home and play with themselves.

  • CutterInChicago

    I understood that these were balcony tickets but nothing in the letter sent to me indicated that these were student tickets (let alone student tickets they could not sell). I've always known that the balcony was primarily student seating but was not aware that it was 100% student seating (and 99% vertigo inducing).
    The uncertainty should have really been thought through, especially if you are going to ask people to put down over a $500 a ticket for balcony seats for a team that tries hard but does not win much. The irksome part is that even if you took them up on the offer and bought the balcony seats, you were not guaranteed a spot in the ticket wait list for season tickets (which should not be impacted by student ticket availability). They were not able to tell me at the time that I would get any sort of Varsity Club points for purchasing balcony seats.

  • CutterInChicago

    I understood that these were balcony tickets but nothing in the letter sent to me indicated that these were student tickets (let alone student tickets they could not sell). I've always known that the balcony was primarily student seating but was not aware that it was 100% student seating (and 99% vertigo inducing).
    The uncertainty should have really been thought through, especially if you are going to ask people to put down over a $500 a ticket for balcony seats for a team that tries hard but does not win much. The irksome part is that even if you took them up on the offer and bought the balcony seats, you were not guaranteed a spot in the ticket wait list for season tickets (which should not be impacted by student ticket availability). They were not able to tell me at the time that I would get any sort of Varsity Club points for purchasing balcony seats.

  • CutterInChicago

    I understood that these were balcony tickets but nothing in the letter sent to me indicated that these were student tickets (let alone student tickets they could not sell). I've always known that the balcony was primarily student seating but was not aware that it was 100% student seating (and 99% vertigo inducing).
    The uncertainty should have really been thought through, especially if you are going to ask people to put down over a $500 a ticket for balcony seats for a team that tries hard but does not win much. The irksome part is that even if you took them up on the offer and bought the balcony seats, you were not guaranteed a spot in the ticket wait list for season tickets (which should not be impacted by student ticket availability). They were not able to tell me at the time that I would get any sort of Varsity Club points for purchasing balcony seats.

  • Even at $5, those tickets are overpriced!
    For those of us who have been up there we know they might be some of the worst seats in all of college sports!

  • Even at $5, those tickets are overpriced!
    For those of us who have been up there we know they might be some of the worst seats in all of college sports!

  • Even at $5, those tickets are overpriced!
    For those of us who have been up there we know they might be some of the worst seats in all of college sports!

  • Even at $5, those tickets are overpriced!
    For those of us who have been up there we know they might be some of the worst seats in all of college sports!