Stern and Brand ponder new age limit rule

brand2.jpgA report this morning by Jeff Goodman of Foxsports.com says that NBA commissioner David Stern and NCAA President Myles Brand are in agreement that both entities would benefit from a new rule requiring players to stay in college for two seasons.

According to sources, the proposal would still need to be passed through the NBA Players Association.

“It’s a big step for the owners and the commissioner to say they’re ready to bargain in good faith to get the rule passed,” said one college coach who wished to remain anonymous. “The NBA is willing to give up something to get this rule passed; we just don’t know what it is yet.”

The NBA adopted a 19-year-old age limit through the collective bargaining agreement which expires in 2010-11.

Since the NBA put the current age restriction in place, I’ve always felt it either needed to be two years (or more) or done away with completely. If you’re going to require players to attend college, get in line with college football and college baseball and make it a three year out of high school rule. All the current rule has done is create the phrase “one and done.”

There will always be those who argue that players should be able to jump directly to the NBA from high school and they’ll throw out the success stories of Kobe Bryant, Tracy McGrady, Kevin Garnett and countless others. For every Bryant, McGrady and Garnett, there’s a Lenny Cooke, Korleone Young and DeAngelo Collins. Guys who would have benefited greatly from college but instead tested the NBA waters and got burned.

So what are your thoughts on the current rule and this new proposal? Do you agree with having an age limit rule to enter the NBA or should players have a right to enter the league immediately following high school?  Thoughts are welcome in the comments.

  • BrianK

    Some do stay in college too long like Hibbert

  • JerryCT

    Tennis used to be clearly divided between amateur and professional with the amateur game the one people liked the most. Today I think people prefer the college basketball product over the NBA product.

    What worries me is if there is a 2or 3+year rule , more good players will go to the NBDL instead of college. If true the it will hurt the college game not help it just like tprofessional tennis killed the interest in amateur tennis.

  • ALH_00

    knowing nothing for certain, I would think that the NBA can set whatever restrictions it decides prudent…of course with the approval of the owners and the players association. It is a self-governing association of teams that can make whatever rules it pleases regarding who is eligible to participate in its league.

    Again, I have no law or facts to back that up, so I welcome a more clear explanation as well.

  • ALH_00

    It may hurt the level of play some (which has been outstanding this year imo), but college basketball (esp. at IU, Kentucky, UNC, UCLA, KU, etc…) is about tradition; it's about the school; it's about rivalry and pride. The students, alumni, and to a lesser extent the general fan base, will always support college athletics in general and basketball at IU in particular. I don't think any form of professional basketball can diminish the importance of IU v. Purdue, or IU v. Kentucky, or UNC v. Duke, or [insert rivalry here], because it is as much about the uniforms, pagentry, rivalry and fans as it is the players. For example, ND went 3-9 last year in Football…but, try to get a ND ticket from the box office for this fall.

  • BTOWN40

    Probably because the exposure and hype for a player are in college. Someone that goes to Europe or the NBDL may be forgotten about if the don't perform well

  • BTOWN40

    Bad suggestion the college game would end up looking like a league just above the high school level,

  • kgork

    You know because you can't develop these in the NBA

  • B_MD

    I still disagree. Not trying to split hairs, but I think 9 out of the 37 have played in anAll-Star game. You could also argue that Al Jefferson, Josh Smith and Monta Ellis all have a legitimate shot at one day playing in one. That's 12 out of 37 players or 32 percent. That's a huge rate of a group of players making an All-Stare game.

    I'm not a big John Hollinger fan, but I believe he's done some statistics that prove that direct to high school players are overwhelmingly more successful than players that went to college.

  • sierracoach

    Stern and Brand can ponder whatever they want but it doesn't matter until and unless the players union agrees to it in the next collective bargaining agreement–which won't be until at least 2011 (unless the NBA exercises its 1-year option, in which case the current CBA won't expire until 2012).

  • B_MD

    I'm not trying to hammer you on this, it's just that I really think you're wrong on this. You just named Kobe, tracy and KG in your example…That's three different versions of “For every Kobe”.

    I've worked with some of these guys and I can attest personally that these guys learn way more practicing a full season in the NBA than they ever would playing in college. And like I pointed out above a vast majority of these guys pan out, especially when you compare them to the rate of college players that pan out.

  • gogoiu

    Most of these guys major in “Sports and Leisure Management” (in other words – basketball). They either make the pros or manage shuffleboard tournaments at an old folks home. Let them try to make some money earlier.

  • http://bradzurcher.wordpress.com bz

    playing in the nba is a PRIVILAGE not a right. there is no law that says an employer HAS to employ someone or that someone HAS to be employed. that's capitalism. i turn people down for jobs every day. it's not their right to work for me, it's a privilege. this in turn makes it my privilege to employee who i wish.

    certainly it would behoove me to employ the best and most talented, but sometimes the best and the most talented aren't necessarily the same person. i can hire a kid straight out of high school, but there is a lot i'm going to have to teach him. he may have raw skills, but he doesn't have the experience of being in this position before, and he most likely won't have a developed business acumen or an understanding of common business principles. i also will question his ability to represent my company when put on the spot. in short, he may become my best salesperson, but he's not going to be for a while. most business people would rather hire a kid out of college who is more likely to succeed sooner rather than later. he's still going to take some polishing, but only a couple of months, not years. i can take the best and the brightest right out of high school, but i'm going to have to educate them on my own dime and time. see any parallels?

    everybody's favorite success stories are bryant, mcgrady, and garnett (lebron doesn't count because he is in a league of his own). those three weren't anything more that sixth or seventh men their first two years in the league. it wasn't until their third year that they because starters and started posting the numbers that we are used to today.

    nba owners and gm's have established a practice of hiring kids straight out of college who don't have the experience, acumen, or savvy to contribute in the same way that they can contribute after if they had attended college, but the thought of losing out on that potential is something there are willing to pay for.

    this age rule has come about because there is more talent in the association that ever before and gm's/owners feel like they can afford to miss out on the potential because of all of the options that will give them immediate returns. a day will come when there isn't enough talent to go around and they will look for ways to get around the rule in order to get the best talent back to the association.

    edit: sorry that was so long. these fingers just kept on going.

  • bahickma

    I completely agree with you B. When Monta Ellis and Martell Webster declared for the NBA Draft out of my high school class I thought they were nuts, and they are decent contributors in the NBA. While not all of the guys who made the leap from high school to the pros panned out quite like they had hoped, there are still a significant number who did make a difference in the game.

    And the argument that for every Kobe there's a DeAngelo Collins really doesn't matter. You could say the same thing about good college players. For every Tim Duncan there's a Trajan Langdon.

  • SteveEyl

    You may turn down people every day, but if you did it:
    A. before interviewing them or even seeing their resume
    B. solely on the basis of their age (after they are emancipated adults), you might be in a little legal trouble

    I think the answer is the union and the CBA, not the employer's right to hire/fire….

  • B_MD

    Exactly, and for every Brad Miller there's 1,000 Todd Fuller's.

    But the basic point is still that for every Kobe there isn't a DeAngelo Collins. I noted above that since 1995 (KG's draft year) 37 high school players have been drafted, and 31 were on a roster, plus Jonathan Bender would be if he hadn't gotten injured. 31-out-of-37 have remained in the league, that's an absurdly high rate.

  • http://bradzurcher.wordpress.com bz

    a. i'll look at their resume, but if it only says high school, it gets weeded out.

    b. it's not solely their age at all. i specifically said that it was because of their experience. it just so happens that because they are young, they don't happen to have that experience. it is my right as an employer to require a certain amount of experience.

    you are right in that the union has a certain amount of power in whether or not this happens, but the fact of the matter is that the nba does have the right to require a certain amount of experience outside of high school.

  • keithr812

    MY ONLY COMMENT IS I CAN'T BELIEVE THERE'S ACTUALLY A PHOTO THAT CAPTURES HOW MUCH OF A DOUCHEBAG MYLES BRAND REALLY IS. I'D STILL LIKE TO FIND THIS “man” IN A DARK ALLEY SOMEWHERE AND INTRODUCE HIS ANUS TO MY SIZE 13.

  • keithr812

    MAMALICKABOOBOODAY ,AFTER READING YOUR COMMENT, IT LOOKS LIKE YOU COULD HAVE PAID A LITTLE MORE ATTENTION IN ENGLISH. I'VE SEEN 3RD GRADERS WHO CAN PUT FULL SENTENCES TOGETHER. AND JUST SO YOU KNOW, ITS SPELLED THERE, NOT THE. COME ON MAN SERIOUSLY.

  • http://mamalickaboobooday.disqus.com mamalickaboobooday

    Who are you? I belive you know me b/c you are trying to bust my balls…which I am very much appreciative of. Unmask thyself dear friend. You're someone in b-town, yes, but not much else is revealed…

    Who art thou???

  • http://bradzurcher.wordpress.com bz

    a. i'll look at their resume, but if it only says high school, it gets weeded out.

    b. it's not solely their age at all. i specifically said that it was because of their experience. it just so happens that because they are young, they don't happen to have that experience. it is my right as an employer to require a certain amount of experience.

    you are right in that the union has a certain amount of power in whether or not this happens, but the fact of the matter is that the nba does have the right to require a certain amount of experience outside of high school.

  • keithr812

    MY ONLY COMMENT IS I CAN'T BELIEVE THERE'S ACTUALLY A PHOTO THAT CAPTURES HOW MUCH OF A DOUCHEBAG MYLES BRAND REALLY IS. I'D STILL LIKE TO FIND THIS “man” IN A DARK ALLEY SOMEWHERE AND INTRODUCE HIS ANUS TO MY SIZE 13.

  • keithr812

    MAMALICKABOOBOODAY ,AFTER READING YOUR COMMENT, IT LOOKS LIKE YOU COULD HAVE PAID A LITTLE MORE ATTENTION IN ENGLISH. I'VE SEEN 3RD GRADERS WHO CAN PUT FULL SENTENCES TOGETHER. AND JUST SO YOU KNOW, ITS SPELLED THERE, NOT THE. COME ON MAN SERIOUSLY.

  • http://mamalickaboobooday.disqus.com mamalickaboobooday

    Who are you? I belive you know me b/c you are trying to bust my balls…which I am very much appreciative of. Unmask thyself dear friend. You're someone in b-town, yes, but not much else is revealed…

    Who art thou???

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